Green Christian Leaflet

God created our beautiful planet Earth to be our home. God loves all created things, including plants, animals, insects, fungi, bacteria and the soil which nourishes everything. The United Nations estimates that three quarters of our land and two thirds of our oceans have been severely altered by human activity. If the natural world is over-exploited it may never recover.

Biodiversity is the variety of life on Earth, including variation within species. Such genetic diversity enables species to survive in adversity, such as disease, drought and climate change. Ecology is the study of living things, together with their environment and how they interrelate. All life on Earth is part of the same ecosystem. What happens to one species affects many others.

At least 130 fruit and vegetable crops depend on insects for pollination, including almonds, apples, aubergines, beans, blueberries, broccoli, carrot, cauliflower, celery, cherry, cucumber, kiwifruit, pears, peppers, pumpkin, tomatoes.

Science says… A 2019 report* by the United Nations (UN) states:

• The current high extinction rate is accelerating. 680 vertebrate species (animals, birds and fish) have been driven to extinction by humans since the 16th century. We have lost about 50% of the world’s wildlife in the past 40 years.

• Around a third of the Earth’s forested area has been lost since the start of the industrial revolution. Forests are home to millions of species. Causes of wildlife decline globally based on analysis of 3,430 populations

The climate crisis, with weather systems breaking down, will cause extinction rates to rise more quickly. Even a small temperature rise causes habitats to change and species to be under stress or to die.

Other causes of extinction are over-exploitation of natural resources – fishing, farming, forests – and pollution in water, air and land. (* Global Assessment Study, Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services, May 2019)

The Bible says… God said, “Let the waters swarm with swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the Earth across the expanse of the heavens.” Genesis 1:20.

For every beast of the forest is mine, the cattle on a thousand hills. I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine. Psalm 50: 10-11.

Praise the Lord from the Earth, you great sea creatures and all deeps, fire and hail, snow and mist, stormy wind fulfilling his word! Mountains and all hills, fruit trees and all cedars! Beasts and all livestock, creeping things and flying birds! Kings of the Earth and all peoples, princes and all rulers of the Earth! Psalm 148:7-12.

Solomon spoke about plant life, from the cedar of Lebanon to the hyssop that grows out of walls. He also spoke about animals and birds, reptiles and fish. From all nations people came to listen to Solomon’s wisdom. 1 Kings 4: 33-34.

Are not five sparrows sold for two pennies? Yet not one of them is forgotten before God. Luke 12:6.

For God was pleased to have all His fullness dwell in him, and through Him to reconcile to God all things, whether things on Earth or things in Heaven, by making peace through His blood, shed on the cross. Colossians 1.19-20.

Making a Difference – at home and at church.

Tick any actions you will try.

 Pray for Creation and those who protect it, including children and adults courageously standing up to people in power. Include Creation in Church services.

 Campaign, write to MPs or supermarkets, sign petitions and join marches. Follow “green” groups on social media. Support conservation charities.

 Ensure your savings, and those of your Church, are ethically invested and are not destroying wildlife.

 Make your garden and churchyard wildlife-friendly:

Garden organically; use peat-free compost.

Create a pond – even a small wet area helps

Leave wild areas e.g. log piles and meadows

Allow plants to set seed for birds

 Help people of all ages enjoy the health benefits of outdoor spaces. For example, take Sunday School children on a nature trail; hold an outdoor Church service; go for walks in all seasons; learn to identify local wildlife and plants.

 Buy less and buy ethically: look for recycled paper and sustainably produced/recycled wood products; use less plastic and fewer household chemicals; move towards a plant-based diet. Conservation efforts can and do work: the extinction rate of birds, mammals and amphibians would have been at least 20% greater without conservation action in recent decades.

Some other Christian environmental organisations:

• A Rocha: arocha.org.uk • Operation Noah: operationnoah.org/ • John Ray Initiative: jri.org.uk/ Gardening for wildlife • RSPB: rspb.org.uk • The Wildlife Trusts: wildlifetrusts.org/actions • The Eden Project: edenproject.com

1st Sept Message from Pope Francis

“And God saw that it was good” (Gen 1:25). God’s gaze, at the beginning of the Bible, rests lovingly on his creation. From habitable land to life-giving waters, from fruit-bearing trees to animals that share our common home, everything is dear in the eyes of God, who offers creation to men and women as a precious gift to be preserved.Tragically, the human response to this gift has been marked by sin, selfishness and a greedy desire to possess and exploit. Egoism and self-interest have turned creation, a place of encounter and sharing, into an arena of competition and conflict. In this way, the environment itself is endangered: something good in God’s eyes has become something to be exploited in human hands. Deterioration has increased in recent decades: constant pollution, the continued use of fossil fuels, intensive agricultural exploitation and deforestation are causing global temperatures to rise above safe levels. The increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme weather phenomena and the desertification of the soil are causing immense hardship for the most vulnerable among us. Melting of glaciers, scarcity of water, neglect of water basins and the considerable presence of plastic and microplastics in the oceans are equally troubling, and testify to the urgent need for interventions that can no longer be postponed. We have caused a climate emergency that gravely threatens nature and life itself, including our own.In effect, we have forgotten who we are: creatures made in the image of God (cf. Gen 1:27) and called to dwell as brothers and sisters in a common home. We were created not to be tyrants, but to be at the heart of a network of life made up of millions of species lovingly joined together for us by our Creator. Now is the time to rediscover our vocation as children of God, brothers and sisters, and stewards of creation. Now is the time to repent, to be converted and to return to our roots. We are beloved creatures of God, who in his goodness calls us to love life and live it in communion with the rest of creation.For this reason, I strongly encourage the faithful to pray in these days that, as the result of a timely ecumenical initiative, are being celebrated as a Season of Creation. This season of increased prayer and effort on behalf of our common home begins today, 1 September, the World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation, and ends on 4 October, the feast of Saint Francis of Assisi. It is an opportunity to draw closer to our brothers and sisters of the various Christian confessions. I think in particular of the Orthodox faithful, who have celebrated this Day for thirty years. In this ecological crisis affecting everyone, we should also feel close to all other men and women of good will, called to promote stewardship of the network of life of which we are part.This is the season for letting our prayer be inspired anew by closeness to nature, which spontaneously leads us to give thanks to God the Creator. Saint Bonaventure, that eloquent witness to Franciscan wisdom, said that creation is the first “book” that God opens before our eyes, so that, marvelling at its order, its variety and its beauty, we can come to love and praise its Creator (cf. Breviloquium, II, 5, 11). In this book, every creature becomes for us “a word of God” (cf. Commentarius in Librum Ecclesiastes, I, 2). In the silence of prayer, we can hear the symphony of creation calling us to abandon our self-centredness in order to feel embraced by the tender love of the Father and to share with joy the gifts we have received. We can even say that creation, as a network of life, a place of encounter with the Lord and one another, is “God’s own ‘social network’” (Audience for the Guides and Scouts of Europe, 3 August 2019). Nature inspires us to raise a song of cosmic praise to the Creator in the words of Scripture: “Bless the Lord, all things that grow on the earth, sing praise to him and highly exalt him forever” (Dan 3:76 Vg).It is also a season to reflect on our lifestyles, and how our daily decisions about food, consumption, transportation, use of water, energy and many other material goods, can often be thoughtless and harmful. Too many of us act like tyrants with regard to creation. Let us make an effort to change and to adopt more simple and respectful lifestyles! Now is the time to abandon our dependence on fossil fuels and move, quickly and decisively, towards forms of clean energy and a sustainable and circular economy. Let us also learn to listen to indigenous peoples, whose age-old wisdom can teach us how to live in a better relationship with the environment.This too is a season for undertaking prophetic actions. Many young people all over the world are making their voices heard and calling for courageous decisions. They feel let down by too many unfulfilled promises, by commitments made and then ignored for selfish interests or out of expediency. The young remind us that the earth is not a possession to be squandered, but an inheritance to be handed down. They remind us that hope for tomorrow is not a noble sentiment, but a task calling for concrete actions here and now. We owe them real answers, not empty words, actions not illusions.Our prayers and appeals are directed first at raising the awareness of political and civil leaders. I think in particular of those governments that will meet in coming months to renew commitments decisive for directing the planet towards life, not death. The words that Moses proclaimed to the people as a kind of spiritual testament at the threshold of the Promised Land come to mind: “Therefore choose life, that you and your descendants may live” (Dt 3:19). We can apply those prophetic words to ourselves and to the situation of our earth. Let us choose life! Let us say “no” to consumerist greed and to the illusion of omnipotence, for these are the ways of death. Let us inaugurate farsighted processes involving responsible sacrifices today for the sake of sure prospects for life tomorrow. Let us not give in to the perverse logic of quick profit, but look instead to our common future!In this regard, the forthcoming United Nations Climate Action Summit is of particular importance. There, governments will have the responsibility of showing the political will to take drastic measures to achieve as quickly as possible zero net greenhouse gas emissions and to limit the average increase in global temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius with respect to pre-industrial levels, in accordance with the Paris Agreement goals. Next month, in October, the Amazon region, whose integrity is gravely threatened, will be the subject of a Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops. Let us take up these opportunities to respond to the cry of the poor and of our earth!Each Christian man and woman, every member of the human family, can act as a thin yet unique and indispensable thread in weaving a network of life that embraces everyone. May we feel challenged to assume, with prayer and commitment, our responsibility for the care of creation. May God, “the lover of life” (Wis 11:26), grant us the courage to do good without waiting for someone else to begin, or until it is too late.

From the Vatican, 1 September 2019

Patriarchal Encyclical for Ecclessial New Year 2019

Prot. No. 582

B A R T H O L O M E W

By God’s Mercy Archbishop of Constantinople-New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch To All the Plenitude of the Church Grace,

Peace and Mercy from the Maker of All Creation Our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ

Dearest brother Hierarchs and beloved children in the Lord, With the goodness and grace of the all-bountiful God, today marks the 30th anniversary since the Holy Great Church of Christ established the feast of Indiction and first day of the ecclesiastical year as “the day of environmental protection.” We did not only address our Orthodox faithful, nor again just Christian believer or even representatives of other religions, but also political leaders, environmentalists and other scientists, as well as intellectuals and all people of good will, seeking their contribution.

The ecological activities of the Ecumenical Patriarchate served as the inspiration for theology to advance prominently the truth of Christian anthropology and cosmology, the Eucharistic worldview and treatment of creation, along with the spirit of Orthodox asceticism as the basis for understanding the reason for and response to the ecological crisis. The bibliography related to theological ecology or ecological theology is extensive and on the whole constitutes an admirable Orthodox witness before the major challenges of contemporary humanity and earthly life. Concern for the ecological crisis and for the global dimensions and consequences of sin – of this alienating internal “reversal of values” in humankind – brought to the surface the connection between ecological and social issues as well as for the need to address them jointly. Mobilizing forces for the protection of the integrity of creation and for social justice are interconnected and inseparable actions.

The interest of the Ecumenical Patriarchate for the protection of creation did not arise as a reaction to or as a result of the contemporary ecological crisis. The latter was simply the motivation and occasion for the Church to express, develop, proclaim and promote its environmentally-friendly principles. The foundation of the Church’s undiminished concern for the natural environment lies in its ecclesiological identity and theology. Respect and care for creation are a dimension of our faith, the content of our life in the Church and as the Church. The very life of the Church is “an experienced ecology,” an applied respect and care for creation, and the source of its environmental activities. In essence, the interest of the Church for the protection of the environment is the extension of the Holy Eucharist in all dimensions of its relationship to the world. The liturgical life of the Church, the ascetic ethos, pastoral service and experience of the cross and resurrection by the faithful, the unquenchable desire for eternity: all of these comprise a communion of persons for which the natural reality cannot be reduced to an object or useful matter to meet the needs of an individual or humanity; by contrast, this reality is considered as an act, indeed the handiwork of a personal God, who calls us to respect and protect it, thereby rendering us His “coworkers,” “stewards,” “guardians,” and “priests” of creation in order to cultivate a Eucharistic relationship with it.

Care for the natural environment is not an added activity, but an essential expression of church life. It does not have a secular, but rather a purely ecclesiastical character. It is a “liturgical ministry.” All of the initiatives and activities of the Church are “applied ecclesiology.” In this sense, theological ecology does not merely refer to the development of an ecological awareness or the response to ecological problems on the basis of the principles of Christian anthropology and cosmology. On the contrary, it involves the renewal of the whole creation in Christ, just as this is realized and experienced in the Holy Eucharist, which is an image and foretaste of the eschatological fullness of the Divine Economy in the doxological wholeness and luminous splendor of the heavenly kingdom.

Most honorable brothers and most precious children in the Lord,

The ecological crisis reveals that our world comprises an integral whole, that our problems are global and shared. In order to meet these challenges, we require a multilayered mobilization, a common accord, direction and action. It is inconceivable for humankind to recognize the severity of the problem and yet continue to behave in oblivion. While in recent decades the dominant model of economic development in the context of globalization – highlighting the fetishism of financial markers and magnification of financial profit – has exacerbated ecological and economic problems, the notion still prevails widely that “there is no other alternative” and that not conforming to the rigid validity logic of the world’s economy will lead to unbridled social and financial situations. Thus, any alternative forms of development, along with the power of social solidarity and justice, are overlooked and undermined.

For our part, however, we are obliged to assume greater measures for the application of the ecological and social consequences of our faith. It is extremely vital that our archdioceses and metropolises, as well as many of our parishes and sacred monasteries, have fostered initiatives and activities for the protection of the environment, but also various programs of ecological education. We should pay special attention to the Christian formation of our youth, so that it may function as an area of cultivation and development of an ecological ethos and solidarity. Childhood and adolescence are particularly susceptible life phases for ecological and social responsiveness. Aware of the urgency of environmental education, the Ecumenical Patriarchate devoted the Third in its series of international Halki Summits to the subject of “Theological Education and Ecological Awareness” (Istanbul, May 31st to June 4th, 2019) with a view to incorporating ecology and environmental awareness into programs and curricula of theological schools and seminaries. The solution to the great challenges of our world is unattainable without spiritual orientation.

In conclusion, then, we wish all of you a favorable and blessed ecclesiastical year, filled with works pleasing to God. We invite the radiant children of the Mother Church throughout the world to pray for the integrity of creation, to be sustainable and charitable in every aspect of their lives, to strive for the protection of the natural environment, as well as the promotion of peace and justice. And we proclaim once more the truth that there can be no genuine progress, when the “very good” creation and the human person made in the image and likeness of God suffer. Finally, through the intercession of the first-among-the-saints Theotokos Pammakaristos, we invoke upon you the life-giving grace and boundless mercy of the Creator and Provider of all.

September 1, 2019

Bartholomew of Constantinople

Your fervent supplicant before God

Statement on the Global Wildfires by His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew

In recent weeks, our planet has witnessed extreme heatwaves and expansive wildfires throughout the world—from the rain forests of the Amazon and desert regions of Africa, normally snow-covered regions such as the Arctic and Alaska to far away countries from Spain to Siberia. Month after month, we have experienced record temperatures and unprecedented heatwaves, resulting in the destruction of millions of acres and the disruption of millions of people. And the intensity of these fires and storms is progressively increasing and intensifying, mandating critical and commensurate changes on our part.  


Scientists warn us about the threat of such fires to the world’s ecosystems, which are becoming increasingly jeopardized and vulnerable. The impact of these fires could reverberate for generations, affecting soil, infrastructure, and human beings. Trees are vital for the soil, for our survival and for our soul. Trees are not simply valuable for their aesthetic beauty or commercial benefit, but essentially for our defense against climate change. Planting more trees is certainly commendable, but cutting down less trees is perhaps the most compelling response to global warming. 


While this global wildfire crisis may not entirely or exclusively be a consequence or cause of climate change, the calamitous events that the world is now experiencing undoubtedly and undeniably sound the alarm about the urgent and dire repercussions of a rising level of carbon emissions. Therefore, if nothing else, such extreme phenomena compel us to consider the fundamental fragility of nature, the limited resources of our planet, and the unique sacredness of creation.


In our Encyclical that will appear on September 1st, we outline the diverse initiatives and activities pioneered by the Ecumenical Patriarchate over the last thirty years, while observing the fundamental principles and precepts proposed by the Orthodox Church over the last twenty centuries with regard to preserving God’s creation.


We pray for all those threatened or afflicted by the fires in all corners of our world. We call all faithful and all people of good will to consider carefully how we live, what we consume, and where our priorities lie, using the words of the Divine Liturgy: “Let us pay attention! Let us stand with awe!”

At the Phanar, Saturday August 24th, 2019

What the Amazon fires mean for wild animals

“In the Amazon, nothing is adapted to fire.” 10 percent of Earth’s animal species live there.


Natasha Daly is a writer and editor at National Geographic, where she covers animal welfare and exploitation. LY


PUBLISHED AUGUST 23, 2019

The Amazon rainforest—home to one in 10 species on Earth—is on fire. As of last week, 9,000 wildfires were raging simultaneously across the vast rainforest of Brazil and spreading into Bolivia, Paraguay, and Peru. The blazes, largely set intentionally to clear land for cattle ranching, farming, and logging, have been exacerbated by the dry season. They’re now burning in massive numbers, an 80 percent increase over this time last year, according toBrazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE). The fires can even be seen from space.

For the thousands of mammal, reptile, amphibian, and bird species that live in the Amazon, the wildfires’ impact will come in two phases: one immediate, one long-term.

“In the Amazon, nothing is adapted to fire,” says William Magnusson, a researcher specializing in biodiversity monitoring at the National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA) in Manaus, Brazil.

In some forests, including many across the U.S., wildfires are essential for maintaining healthy ecosystems. Animals are adapted to cope with it; many even rely on it to thrive. The black-bellied woodpecker, for example, native to the American West, only nests in burnt-out trees and eats the beetles that infest burned wood.

But the Amazon is different.

The rainforest is so uniquely rich and diverse precisely because it doesn’t really burn, says Magnusson. While fires do sometimes happen naturally, they’re typically small in scale and burn low to the ground. And they’re quickly put out by rain.

“Basically, the Amazon hadn’t burnt in hundreds of thousands or millions of years,” says Magnusson. It’s not like in Australia, for instance, where eucalyptus would die out without regular fires, he says. The rainforest is not built for fire.

How are the fires affecting individual animals right now?

It’s likely they’re taking a “massive toll on wildlife in the short term,” says Mazeika Sullivan, associate professor at Ohio State University’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, who has done fieldwork in the Colombian Amazon.

Generally, in the midst of wildfire, Sullivan says, animals have very few choices. They can try to hide by burrowing or going into water, he says. They can be displaced. Or they can perish. In this situation, a lot of animals will die, from flames, heat from the flames, or smoke inhalation, Sullivan says

“You’ll have immediate winners and immediate losers,” says Sullivan. “In a system that isn’t adapted to fire, you’ll have a lot more losers than you will in other landscapes.”

Are some animals likely to do better than others?

Certain traits may be beneficial in the midst of wildfire. Being naturally mobile helps. Large, fast-moving animals like jaguars and pumas, Sullivan says, may be able to escape, as may some birds. But slow-moving animals like sloths and anteaters, as well as smaller creatures like frogs and lizards, may die, unable to move out of the fire’s path quickly enough. “Escape into the canopy but choose the wrong tree,” Sullivan says, and an animal is likely to die.

Could some already-vulnerable species become more threatened or even extinct?

It’s tough to say. Wildfire in the Amazon is completely different than in the U.S., Europe, or Australia, where we know a lot about species distributions, says Magnusson. We don’t know enough about the range of most of the animals in the rainforest to pinpoint which species are under threat.

Nevertheless, there are a few specific species of concern.

Milton’s titi, a monkey discovered in 2011, has only ever been documented in a part of Brazil in the southern Amazon that’s currently beset by fire. Another recently discovered monkey, the Mura’s saddleback tamarin, lives in a small range in central Brazil—also threatened by encroaching wildfire, says Carlos César Durigan, director of the Wildlife Conservation Society of Brazil. It’s possible these species are native to these specific regions, Durigan says. “I [fear] we may be losing many of these endemic species.”

What about aquatic animals?

Large bodies of water are mostly safe in the short term. But animals in small rivers or creeks—which are highly biologically diverse—could be in trouble. In smaller streams, “fires burn right over,” says Sullivan. Water-dwelling amphibians, which need to stay partially above water in order to breathe, would be in harm’s way. Fire could also change water chemistry to the point that it isn’t sustainable for life in the short term, Sullivan says.

How might the fires’ aftermath affect species?

This is the second major blow. “Longer-term effects are likely to be more catastrophic,” says Sullivan. The entire ecosystem of the burning sections of rainforest will be altered. For example, the dense canopy of the Amazon rainforest largely blocks sunlight from reaching the ground. Fire opens up the canopy at a stroke, bringing in light and fundamentally changing the energy flow of the entire ecosystem. This can have cascading effects on the entire food chain, Sullivan says.

ANIMALSWhat the Amazon fires mean for wild animals

Surviving in a fundamentally transformed ecosystem would be a struggle for many species. Lots of amphibians, for instance, have textured, camouflaged skin that resembles the bark or leaves of a tree, allowing them to blend in. “Now, all of a sudden, the frogs are forced to be on a different background,” says Sullivan. “They become exposed.”

And many animals in the Amazon are specialists—species have evolved and adapted to thrive in niche habitats. Toucans, for instance, eat fruits that other animals can’t access—their long beaks help them reach into otherwise inaccessible crevices. Wildfire decimating the fruit the birds depend upon would likely plunge the local toucan population into crisis. Spider monkeyslive high in the canopy to avoid competition below. “What happens when you lose the canopy?” Sullivan asks. “They’re forced into other areas with more competition.”

The only “winners” in burned forest are likely to be raptors and other predators, Sullivan says, as cleared-out landscapes could make hunting easier.

Are there other consequences for wild animals?

Magnusson is most concerned about the overall repercussions of forest loss.

“Once you take the rainforest away, [you lose] 99 percent of all species,” he says. If these wildfires were a one-off, he wouldn’t necessarily be worried, he says, but he notes there’s been a fundamental change in policy in Brazil “that encourages deforestation.” He’s referring to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s commitment to open up the Amazon for business. “The political signal that’s gone out is basically that there’s no law anymore, so anybody can do what they want.”

Conservationists and concerned citizens have taken social media, and #PrayForAmazonas became Twitter’s top-trending hashtag on Wednesday. Many criticized the Bolsonaro government’s policies. Others expressed concern that the global demand for beef incentivizes the accelerated clearing of land for cattle ranching. Environmentalists are also calling attention to the consequences that a burning Amazon—often called the lungs of the planet—would have on climate change. By Thursday, #PrayForAmazonas had spurred momentum for a spin-off hashtag: #ActForAmazonas.

There’s an area along the southern border of the Amazon rainforest, in the Brazilian states of Pará, Mato Grosso, and Rondônia, called the “deforestation arc,” Magnusson says. There, wildfire is pushing the edge of the rainforest north, possibly changing the border forever.

“We know the least about it,” he says of this region. “We may lose species without ever knowing they were there.”S

The EAT-Lancet Commission report on Healthy Diets From Sustainable Food Systems.

This report – click on the link- was prepared by EAT and is an adapted summary of the Commission Food in The Anthropocene: the EAT-Lancet Commission on Healthy Diets From Sustainable Food Systems. It again highlights how we must move from an unsustainable animal-based diet to sustainable plant based diets. Website has access to the full report.

PERSPECTIVE THÉOLOGIQUE SUR L’INTERCONNEXION DU CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE, DES CHOIX ALIMENTAIRES ET DE LA SOUFFRANCE DES ANIMAUX, Dr. Christina Nellist La tradition vivante de l’Église orthodoxe orientale

PERSPECTIVE THÉOLOGIQUE SUR L’INTERCONNEXION DU CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE, DES CHOIX ALIMENTAIRES ET DE LA SOUFFRANCE DES ANIMAUX

La tradition vivante de l’Église orthodoxe orientale
trad. Jean-Marc Noyelle

Ceci est une version révisée de mon article dans la dernière édition du Journal international de théologie orthodoxe et une partie de mon livre Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Animal Suffering (“Le christianisme orthodoxe oriental et la souffrance animale”) : Ancient Voices in Modern Theology (“anciennes voix dans la théologie moderne”). Cela a constitué la base de ma récente présentation à la conférence IOTA en Roumanie en janvier 2019. 
Dr. Christina Nellist, est une chercheuse invitée (Visiting Fellow) et chercheuse à l’Université de Winchester, rédactrice en chef de Pan Orthodox Concern for Animals.

Certains pourraient soutenir que les sujets abordés dans cet article ne relèvent pas du discours théologique ou éthique orthodoxe oriental. Ce n’est pas le cas. Nous avons des enseignements à la fois anciens et contemporains, qui nous donnent l’autorité nécessaire pour aborder ces sujets importants.

« Lequel d’entre vous, ayant un fils ou un bœuf tombé dans un puits, ne le sortira pas immédiatement un jour de sabbat ? » (Lc 14,5) (1)

« Maintenant, parmi toutes les choses, notre monde doit être pris dans nos bras. C’est aussi ce qui a été fait par Sa Parole, comme nous le dit l’Ecriture dans le livre de la Genèse. »(Saint Irénée) (2)

« Et ne vous étonnez pas que le monde entier ait été racheté ; car ce n’était pas un simple homme, mais le Fils unique de Dieu qui mourut pour lui. »(Saint Cyrille de Jérusalem) (3)

« Dieu a tout prévu, il n’a rien négligé. Son œil, qui ne dort jamais, veille sur tout. Il est présent partout et donne à chaque être le moyen de sa conservation. Si Dieu n’a pas laissé l’oursin en dehors de sa providence, ne se soucie-t-il point de vous ? »(Saint Basile) (4)

L’allocution de Sa Sainteté. Bartholomée aux érudits orthodoxes est un exemple de voix d’autorités contemporaines :

« L’orthodoxie est une foi en même temps enracinée dans le passé et simultanément une église tournée vers l’avenir. Elle se caractérise par un sens profond de continuité avec les temps et les enseignements de l’Église apostolique et de l’Église des Pères ; mais c’est aussi une Église qui puise dans son riche patrimoine pour répondre aux défis et aux dilemmes modernes. C’est précisément cette double nature qui permet à l’Orthodoxie de parler avec audace de problèmes contemporains critiques, précisément parce qu’il s’agit d’une « tradition vivante » (5).

Dans cet article, nous décrivons cette « tradition vivante » en examinant les défis actuels de la souffrance animale en ce qui concerne le changement climatique, les choix alimentaires et la production d’aliments d’origine animale. La question du choix d’un régime alimentaire est une question parmi beaucoup qui sont importantes pour des milliards d’humains à travers le monde, non seulement à cause de la souffrance animale impliquée, mais également à cause du lien qui existe entre notre choix d’un régime alimentaire à base animale et son impact significatif. sur notre environnement et la santé humaine. Une étude exhaustive de l’interconnexion de ces sujets n’est pas possible ici, car elle nécessiterait sa propre monographie. J’ai plutôt essayé d’équilibrer le besoin de faits et de réalisme plutôt que les platitudes, tout en limitant le matériel utilisé et en tenant compte de la nécessité d’être compatissant envers le lecteur. Cette discussion examine spécifiquement les implications pratiques et la souffrance animale impliquées dans notre choix de nourriture, ainsi que les implications sotériologiques (oeuvre rédemtrice du Christ pour le monde).

Une vérité qui dérange – Le sacrifice et la révolution spirituelle

Le défi permanent qui nous attend tous est de savoir comment appliquer les enseignements orthodoxes anciens et contemporains à la compassion pour « tout » dans la création et élargir notre compréhension de la communauté, de la justice, de la miséricorde et des droits envers les animaux dans le cadre du système d’élevage intensif . Stylios (1989) suggère que nous menions une « vie de justice » (6), qui est interprétée par Harakas comme « le moyen d’éviter le profit immoral, l’injustice et l’exploitation ». Cela s’aligne avec l’enseignement du Métropolite Kallistos sur les « profits pervers » et « l’utilisation immorale d’animaux » dans l’élevage intensif. Harakas affirme également que la justice est le « bon ordre » de la nature humaine (8) où la valeur inhérente de la création exige une approche responsable, « un traitement approprié » (9). En ce sens, Harakas partage les mêmes vues que Bonhoeffer (1971) (10) qui affirme que ces devoirs découlent de droits, qu’il a accordés au monde naturel. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée et Métropolite John Zizioulas expriment un point de vue similaire en nous conseillant d’élargir notre compréhension de la communauté, d’être une voix pour le reste de la création dont les droits sont violés (11) et pour étendre notre amour au monde non humain. (12) Sa Sainteté Bartholomée préconise d’étendre la justice « au-delà des êtres humains à l’ensemble de la création » :

« L’un des problèmes les plus fondamentaux à la base de la crise écologique est le manque de justice qui prévaut dans notre monde… La tradition liturgique et patristique… considère comme juste la personne compatissante qui donne librement en se servant de l’amour pour seul critère. La justice s’étend même au-delà des êtres humains à l’ensemble de la création. L’incinération des forêts, l’exploitation criminelle de ressources naturelles… tout cela constitue une expression de transgression des vertus de la justice. » (13)

Les théologiens orthodoxes orientaux ont demandé à maintes reprises à l’humanité de changer son éthique, fondée sur une théorie de la consommation continue, en une idéologie eucharistique et esthétique de l’amour, de la vertu, du sacrifice, de l’abstinence et de la purification du péché. En substance, ils nous rappellent les enseignements patristiques pour limiter et contrôler nos désirs. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée confirme l’enseignement orthodoxe concernant la mentalité préjudiciable et permanente de domination plutôt que sur celle de l’amour :

« Malheureusement, l’humanité a perdu la relation liturgique entre le Dieu créateur et la création ; au lieu de prêtres et de serviteurs, les êtres humains ont été réduits à des tyrans et à des abuseurs de la nature (14). »

« Trop souvent, il s’agit de victimes innocentes et nous devrions considérer cette souffrance imméritée avec compassion et sympathie. » (15)

En tant qu’êtres vivants, sensibles et facilement blessés, ils doivent être considérés comme un« tu », pas un« il », pour utiliser la terminologie de Martin Buber : non comme des objets à exploiter et à manipuler, mais comme des sujets, capables de joie et de chagrin. , de bonheur et d’affliction” (16).

Sa Sainteté Bartholomée utilise le mot ’nature’ pour indiquer que son enseignement intègre les animaux et corrobore l’argument selon lequel l’abus et l’exploitation des animaux ont des conséquences négatives non seulement pour les animaux victimes d’abus, sous forme de douleur physique, de souffrance et de peur psychologique, mais aussi de troubles sotériologiques (concernant le salut de l’âme) négatifs. implications pour l’humanité. Je soutiens qu’en plus des auteurs d’actes de cruauté et d’exploitation, ceux qui sont au courant de ces actes mais qui leur sont indifférents et ceux qui savent, mais craignent d’essayer en quelque sorte d’atténuer les abus, donnent en un sens une approbation tacite à ce processus et sont des accessoires des faits commis. Il déclare que pour les chrétiens orthodoxes, cet esprit ascétique « n’est pas la négation, mais une utilisation raisonnable et équilibrée du monde ». Il attire également notre attention sur la vérité qui dérange d’une dimension manquante et du besoin de sacrifice :

« Ce besoin d’esprit ascétique peut être résumé en un seul mot clé : sacrifice. C’est la dimension manquante de notre éthique environnementale et de notre action écologique. »(17)

Il clarifie ce point avec des enseignements sur l’auto-limitation de la consommation et interprète la retenue en termes d’amour, d’humilité, de maîtrise de soi, de simplicité et de justice sociale, autant d’enseignements essentiels pour notre choix de régime et les produits que nous choisissons d’ acheter. De manière cruciale, il reconnaît le problème fondamental de l’inaction et les difficultés à effectuer un changement :

« Nous sommes tous douloureusement conscients de l’obstacle fondamental auquel nous sommes confrontés dans notre travail en faveur de l’environnement. C’est précisément cela : comment passer de la théorie à l’action, du mot aux actes (18). »
“Pour que cette révolution spirituelle se produise, nous devons faire l’expérience d’une métanoïa radicale, d’une conversion des attitudes, des habitudes et des pratiques, en recherchant les moyens par lesquels nous avons mal employé ou abusé de la Parole de Dieu, des dons de Dieu et de la création de Dieu.” (19)

Ce sont des enseignements profonds qui rappellent les avertissements des prophètes d’antan. Cette révolution spirituelle est également nécessaire pour une conversion de la façon dont nous considérons les animaux et donc de la façon dont nous les traitons. Plusieurs de ses enseignements nous incitent à refléter l’ascèse des premiers pères et le besoin urgent de changements dans le comportement humain. Dans notre avidité et notre soif de profits toujours croissants, nous « subordonnons et exploitons la création avec violence et habileté ». Cela détruit non seulement la création, mais « sape également les bases et les conditions nécessaires à la survie des générations futures ». Le commentaire de Kallistos sur le « profit pervers » au chapitre six de mon livre et l’enseignement de Saint Irénée selon lesquels nous ne devons pas utiliser notre liberté comme un « manteau de méchanceté ». Cela fait également allusion à la crise environnementale, exemple moderne de la désharmonie cosmique fréquemment soulignée par les Pères, où diverses formes d’injustice polluent la terre ; où les catastrophes naturelles et la famine sont le résultat du mal que les gens ont fait et que ce mal pollue la terre et met Dieu en colère. On peut soutenir que peu de choses ont changé, car nous commençons à ressentir les conséquences dévastatrices de nos abus et de nos utilisations abusives de la création en général et des animaux en particulier. Notre incapacité à passer de la théorie à la pratique indique que nos faiblesses nous empêchent d’atteindre les idéaux chrétiens. Cependant, ce qui est différent, c’est le manque de temps pour apporter des changements importants à notre comportement.

Choix diététiques et dégradation de l’environnement

Keselopoulos (2001) aborde certains des problèmes humains et environnementaux associés au secteur de l’alimentation et du régime alimentaire à base d’animaux. Il explique que les famines en Afrique, causées par la sécheresse et la désertification, sont dues à la monoculture de produits destinés à nourrir les animaux du Nord. Le résultat en est :

“Le phénomène cynique des réserves de lait en poudre envoyées aux enfants mourants en Afrique, alors que leurs propres terres, au lieu de produire des aliments traditionnels pour un usage local, est rendu stérile par la monoculture d’aliments pour animaux destinés à nourrir le bétail européen (20)”.

C’est un point crucial. Notre mauvaise utilisation de la terre et de l’eau afin de répondre à notre désir croissant de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux a créé un déséquilibre dans le monde naturel, causant des dommages à l’homme et aux animaux. La question qui se pose ici est la suivante : est-ce un péché de continuer à utiliser ce système et ses produits une fois que nous avons pris conscience de ses effets dévastateurs ? Keselopoulos en parle clairement en liant explicitement notre utilisation des animaux comme aliment à la pratique d’un esthétisme, de la compassion et de la pitié pour le monde naturel :

« Ainsi, l’esthétisme met prophétiquement en évidence les prérequis de compassion et de pitié pour la nature et la beauté du monde. C’est ce qui peut entraver la spirale descendante dans la barbarie qui tue le règne animal en transformant génétiquement des animaux élevés pour produire du bœuf ou des produits laitiers en monstres de la nature et en rendant le sol stérile » (21).

Keselopoulos illustre non seulement la tension entre les intérêts économiques et la souffrance animale, en particulier dans les industries de production alimentaire à base d’animaux, mais aussi le fait que la pratique du jeûne limite le nombre de décès. Ce faisant, il affirme les enseignements de Sa Sainteté Bartholomée et d’autres sur la cupidité et les profits pervers ; Les enseignements de Saint Grégoire sur user de, et non mésuser de, et sur la nécessité du sacrifice. Je condense ses commentaires :

« Si toutes les motivations de ces activités humaines sont la cupidité insatiable et le désir de profits faciles, alors le jeûne, en tant que restriction volontaire des besoins humains, peut permettre à l’homme de se libérer, au moins dans une certaine mesure, de ses désirs. Il peut à nouveau découvrir son caractère primitif, qui consiste à se tourner vers Dieu, son prochain et la création, avec une disposition véritablement aimante. L’abstinence face à la viande, observée tout au long de l’année par les moines, limite le nombre de morts que nous provoquons par notre relation au monde. L’abstinence de certains aliments vise simultanément à protéger, même pendant une courte période, des animaux si cruellement dévorés par l’homme. L’esprit de jeûne que nous sommes obligés de préserver aujourd’hui dans notre culture exige de changer le cours de notre relation à la nature, passant d’une prédation assoiffée de sang à cet état de gratitude, qui constitue la marque distinctive de l’Eucharistie” (22).

Je suis d’accord avec son analyse, qui correspond aux dernières recherches scientifiques. (23) Métropolite John Zizioulas fournit un argument similaire :

« La maîtrise de la consommation des ressources naturelles est une attitude réaliste et il faut trouver des moyens de limiter le gaspillage immense de matériaux naturels. » (24)

Si cet argument est pertinent pour le gaspillage de « ressources », il est également approprié pour le gaspillage de la vie animale. J’interprète son utilisation de « ressource » comme une référence à la création inanimée, mais comme il y a, encore une fois, de la confusion sur son sens, je rappelle au lecteur la nécessité d’une plus grande attention dans le choix de notre langue. Bien que Métropolite John croyait qu’il serait irréaliste de s’attendre à ce que nos sociétés suivent un ascétisme qui fasse écho à la vie des saints, dont beaucoup étaient végétariens, des millions de personnes choisissent ce régime non violent. Ils comprennent que, même s’ils ne peuvent pas, en tant qu’individus, être en mesure de changer les pratiques abusives des industries de l’alimentation animale, ils ont la liberté de choisir le régime alternatif non violent prôné par Dieu et le font par compassion et miséricorde pour les animaux et l’environnement. Métropolite Antoine de Sourozh indique que le régime végétalien / végétarien est à imiter et la tragédie serait de ne pas le faire :

« Il est effrayant d’imaginer que l’homme appelé à diriger chaque être sur le chemin de la transfiguration, vers la plénitude de la vie, en arriva au point qu’il ne pouvait plus monter vers Dieu et qu’il était obligé de se nourrir par le meurtre de ceux qu’il aurait dû mener vers la perfection. C’est ici que se termine le cercle tragique. Nous nous trouvons dans ce cercle. Nous sommes tous encore incapables de ne vivre que pour la vie éternelle et selon la parole de Dieu, bien que les saints soient en grande partie revenus à la conception originelle de Dieu concernant l’homme. Les saints nous montrent que nous pouvons, par la prière et les efforts spirituels, nous libérer progressivement du besoin de nous nourrir de la chair des animaux et, devenir de plus en plus assimilés à Dieu, requiert de moins en moins de l’utiliser (25). »

C’est une reconnaissance importante de la part du Métropolite Antoine. Il associe le fait de manger des animaux à une perte de liberté humaine et à notre incapacité à transfigurer nos vies déchues et à monter vers Dieu. Keselopoulos affirme que le végétalisme / végétarisme brise ce cercle. Le fait que de nombreux ascètes étaient et sont végétaliens/végétariens devrait nous rappeler le choix alimentaire originel de Dieu et donc la voie alimentaire la plus appropriée à suivre. Il est important de se rappeler que, même si Dieu nous a donné une dispense pour manger de la viande, il ne nous commande ni ne nous oblige à le faire ; nous conservons la liberté de revenir au choix de Dieu. Peut-être si le Métropolite Antoine en avait plus su sur la cruauté impliquée dans la production d’aliments à base animale, il aurait peut-être également choisi de devenir végétalien/végétarien. Métropolite Kallistos reconnaît cette possibilité :

« Les méthodes telles que l’élevage industriel sont plutôt nouvelles et je pense que si davantage de personnes savaient ce qui se passait, elles pourraient bien cesser de manger de la viande… Les gens qui vivent dans des villes comme moi mangent les produits mais ne connaissent pas trop le fond du problème et je pense que si j’en savais plus sur cet arrière-plan, je pourrais peut-être devenir végétarien. »(26)

Il est intéressant de noter qu’il reconnaît également qu’il est facile de trouver des informations disponibles sur le Web, dans des rapports et des recherches, et souligne ce point évident. Alors, c’est peut-être plus que les gens ne veulent pas savoir, plutôt que de ne pas pouvoir accéder à l’information. Nous voyons ici une trace de Kahneman et de saint Paul ; nous savons quoi faire, mais choisissons de ne pas agir de la bonne manière. Si nous, en tant qu’individus ou en tant que dirigeants de notre Église, défendions un régime végétalien/végétarien non violent, cela réduirait non seulement le nombre d’animaux qui souffrent, mais également les nombreux problèmes environnementaux liés à la production d’aliments pour animaux. Notre désir croissant de consommer des produits d’origine animale a conduit à la reproduction d’un nombre d’animaux si important que de graves impacts négatifs se sont produits sur nos environnements. Knight (2013) nous fournit les informations scientifiques importantes suivantes :

En 2006, l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (Steinfeld et al.) a calculé que, lorsqu’on mesurait le dioxyde de carbone (CO2), 18% des Gaz à Effet de Serre (GES) dans le monde, soit 7,5 milliards de tonnes par an, résultaient de la production de bovins, buffles, moutons, chèvres, chameaux, chevaux, cochons et volailles. Ces émissions résultent du défrichage des terres destinées à la production d’aliments pour le bétail et au pâturage, des animaux eux-mêmes ainsi que du transport et de la transformation de produits d’origine animale. En revanche, on estime que toutes les formes de transport combinées produisent environ 13,5% des GES mondiaux. Les GES produits par la production animale sont composés de CO2, de méthane, d’oxyde nitreux et d’ammoniac. Steinfeld et ses collaborateurs ont calculé que le secteur de l’élevage est responsable de 9% des émissions de CO2 anthropiques, c’est-à-dire imputables à l’activité humaine, qui résultent principalement de la déforestation provoquée par l’empiétement des cultures fourragères et des pâturages. La production animale occupe environ 30% de la surface de la Terre et entraîne de plus en plus de déforestation, en particulier en Amérique latine. [Environ] soixante-dix pour cent des terres amazoniennes autrefois boisées ont maintenant été converties en pâturages, les cultures fourragères couvrant une grande partie du reste.

Les animaux détenus pour la production émettent 37% de méthane anthropique, ce qui représente, selon les calculs, 72 fois le Potentiel de Réchauffement Planétaire (PRP) du CO2, principalement sur la base d’une fermentation gastro-intestinale par les ruminants (notamment les vaches et les moutons). ). Ils émettent également 65% d’oxyde nitreux anthropique avec 296 fois le PRP du CO2, dont la grande majorité est libérée par le fumier. Ils émettent également 64% d’ammoniac anthropique, ce qui contribue de manière significative aux pluies acides et à l’acidification des écosystèmes.

En 2009, Goodland et Anhang ont calculé qu’au moins 22 milliards de tonnes d’émissions de CO2 imputables à la production animale n’étaient pas comptabilisées et qu’au moins 3 milliards de tonnes avaient été mal attribuées par Steinfeld et ses collègues. Les sources non comptées comprenaient la respiration du bétail, la déforestation et les sous-estimations de méthane. Ils ont conclu que la production animale représentait au moins 51% des émissions de GES dans le monde et probablement beaucoup plus. Bien que les chiffres précis restent à l’étude, il est néanmoins clair que les GES issus de la production animale constituent l’un des principaux contributeurs au changement climatique moderne. (27)

Bien que les chiffres précis restent à l’étude, il est néanmoins clair que l’impact du régime alimentaire à base d’animaux sur le réchauffement climatique continue à être sous-estimé et sous-déclaré. Il est vrai que cette situation est en train de changer, mais on se demande combien de personnes ont lu le récent rapport du GIEC et d’autres rapports qui nous donnent des informations actualisées sur ces chiffres et l’ampleur de la fonte des glaces en Antarctique, etc.

Bien que les orthodoxes n’aient pas de système légaliste, je pense que nous manquerions à notre devoir envers les laïcs et à notre rôle de « prêtre de la création » si nous ne faisons pas plus que ce n’est actuellement le cas. En utilisant l’argument de l’intérêt personnel comme facteur de motivation, nous pouvons voir en quoi l’abstinence d’un régime alimentaire à base d’animaux pourrait avoir un impact bénéfique immédiat sur le changement climatique, nos sources d’eau, notre santé et donc notre survie future. Nous n’avons pas besoin d’attendre les accords mondiaux / gouvernementaux pour effectuer des changements réels et immédiats.

Cela répond en partie aux aspects humain et environnemental de ce thème mais qu’en est-il des animaux, que savons-nous de leurs souffrances dans ces industries ? Si nous voulons, en tant qu’individus ou en tant que dirigeants de notre Église, aborder les implications théologiques et éthiques de la souffrance animale, nous devons nous familiariser avec les connaissances disponibles non seulement sur l’impact environnemental d’un régime alimentaire à base d’animaux, mais également sur les souffrances impliquées. dans les systèmes utilisés. Il y a énormément de recherche dans ce domaine et ici, je condense certaines de ces recherches tout en en référant d’autres :

Afin de répondre aux exigences de la production industrielle et de l’habitat à haute densité, les animaux sont systématiquement marqués avec des fers chauds, écornés, débecqués, équeutés et castrés sans sédation ni analgésie… les porcelets ont la queue coupée et les mâles sont castrés en écrasant ou en arrachant leurs testicules sans analgésiques, même si ces interventions provoquent une « douleur considérable » (Broom et Fraser, 1997). Il en va de même pour les agneaux… Le prix de la mutilation est élevé pour chaque animal. Les porcelets montrent des signes de douleur jusqu’à une semaine après (tremblements, léthargie, vomissements et tremblements des jambes). Chez les agneaux, les niveaux d’hormones de stress font un bond énorme et ils montrent des signes de douleur importante pendant quatre heures ou plus. Les veaux laitiers écornés présentent des douleurs pendant six heures ou plus après (Turner, 2006). Les oiseaux aussi sont mutilés sans analgésiques ; les becs sont taillés et parfois les doigts intérieurs sont également coupés. Après le débecquage, les animaux ressentent une douleur aiguë pendant environ deux jours et une douleur chronique durant jusqu’à six semaines (Duncan 2001). Comme les stocks sont nombreux, les maladies et les blessures risquent de ne pas être détectées et sont dues à une densité élevée, au manque d’espace, au manque de stimulation mentale et à l’épuisement physique. des problèmes de santé physique et mentale apparaissent rapidement (Broom et Fraser, 2007). Les veaux de boucherie sont souvent maintenus dans de minuscules enclos et attachés par le cou et succombent rapidement à un « comportement anormal et à une mauvaise santé » (Turner 2006 ; Commission européenne 1995). La production intensive d’œufs affaiblit les os et conduit à la boiterie, à l’ostéoporose et aux douloureuses fractures, car tout le calcium et les minéraux sont utilisés pour la fabrication des œufs, causant « des douleurs à la fois aiguës et chroniques »… pouvant également entraîner des hémorragies internes, la famine et finalement la mort, qui seront douloureuses et « lentes »(Webster 2004 : 184). Les vaches souffrent de mammites et de boiteries (Stokka et al, 1997) et demeurent enceintes afin de maintenir un rendement laitier élevé (Vernelli, 2005 ; Turner, 2006) .(28)

Il n’y a pas d’autre raison à ces pratiques que le désir d’accroître les profits ; le “profit diabolique” que Métropolite Kallistos décrit. Une question qui se pose ici est de savoir si la « révolution spirituelle » requise devrait s’appliquer aux animaux de ces industries. Si la réponse est non, nous devrions examiner pourquoi nous avons choisi d’exclure des trillions d’animaux de la compassion, de la miséricorde et de la justice. Si nous en concluons qu’ils n’existent que pour cet usage, alors je crois que nous risquons de maintenir une mentalité de domination, ce qui indique à son tour que seule la souffrance humaine concerne Dieu. Je soutiens que cet état d’esprit va à l’encontre des enseignements de l’Église chrétienne orthodoxe orientale et s’apparente au type d’hérésies que les pères de l’Église primitive ont eu tant de peine à surmonter.

Après avoir donné un aperçu des souffrances endurées lors de l’élevage des animaux, nous devrions également envisager leur mort. La plupart des gens croient sans doute que l’abattage d’animaux est « humain » et se pratique près de chez eux. Les recherches démontrent que même dans les pays dotés de lois strictes en matière de bien-être animal, des millions de ces êtres risquent de souffrir du processus de transport et d’abattage. Les animaux vivants sont régulièrement transportés par route, rail, mer ou air à travers les continents. Tous les organismes de bienfaisance consacrés au bien-être des animaux s’accordent à dire que le transport sur de longues distances entraîne d’énormes souffrances : surpeuplement, épuisement, déshydratation, douleur et stress. Par exemple, dans l’UE, le temps d’arriver à l’abattoir, 35 millions de poulets sont morts. L’Australie exporte environ quatre millions de moutons vivants chaque année, principalement au Moyen-Orient. Ces animaux peuvent parcourir jusqu’à cinquante heures de route avant d’entamer les trois semaines de voyage en mer et d’effectuer un autre voyage par la route dans le pays importateur. On estime que des dizaines de milliers de moutons meurent avant d’atteindre leur destination. Bien que le gouvernement australien ait mis en place un système d’assurance de la chaîne d’approvisionnement pour l’exportation, des enquêtes menées par des groupes de défense du bien-être des animaux ont révélé de terribles souffrances lors de l’abattage après exportation. Le Canada transporte des animaux de ferme à des milliers de kilomètres à l’intérieur de ses frontières et en Amérique. Les animaux peuvent faire face à des conditions exceptionnellement rudes lorsque le climat passe du froid glacial au soleil brûlant. Les camions utilisés sont souvent sans climatisation. En Inde, les bovins voyagent dans de vastes régions, seuls deux États étant légalement autorisés à abattre des vaches. Les animaux sont souvent brutalement traités et en surpeuplement durant le transport, ce qui entraîne des blessures graves et la mort. Des milliers d’animaux viennent d’Amérique du Sud et sont élevés pour la production de viande bovine en Asie et en Afrique. Ces voyages impliquent souvent des animaux qui passent des semaines en mer et aboutissent à un abattage inhumain. Cela s’ajoute aux problèmes de transport, lorsque des retards, des erreurs ou des accidents se produisent et que des milliers d’animaux meurent dans des circonstances tragiques.

La propagation des maladies est un autre facteur préoccupant. Des maladies telles que le virus de la fièvre catarrhale du mouton, la fièvre aphteuse, la grippe aviaire et la peste porcine peuvent être directement imputables au transport des animaux de ferme. Le déplacement de bétail sur de longues distances vers les marchés et les abattoirs peut propager des maladies infectieuses entre animaux d’un pays à l’autre. Les animaux peuvent voyager d’un pays à l’autre avec peu de contrôles médicaux, ce qui peut entraîner la propagation de maladies. En 2007, des bovins importés d’Europe continentale sont arrivés avec le virus de la fièvre catarrhale car ils n’avaient pas encore été testés avant le début de leur voyage. La souffrance ne se termine souvent pas à la fin du voyage. Duncan nous informe que :

« De toutes les choses que nous faisons à nos animaux à la ferme, celles que nous leur faisons 24 heures avant leur abattage réduisent au maximum leur bien-être. » (29)

Dans de nombreux pays, les animaux sont brutalement chargés, déchargés et déplacés à l’aide d’aiguillons électriques, de bâtons, de cordes, de chaînes et d’objets tranchants. Les normes d’abattage varient. Certains animaux ne sont pas suffisamment assommés ou ne sont pas assommés avant l’abattage :

« Les oiseaux comme les poulets à griller et les dindes sont tirés et traînés par les pattes et poussés dans des caisses avec une hâte extrême (jusqu’à des milliers par heure). Les luxations et les fractures sont fréquents, de même que les blessures internes et la mort. En raison de problèmes d’étourdissement, les oiseaux courent un plus grand risque de rater la machine d’étourdissement et d’entrer dans le réservoir d’échaudage vivants et conscients. »(30)

« Les techniques de saignement peuvent être médiocres, ce qui signifie que les porcs peuvent reprendre conscience en se tenant tête en bas des chaînes de la chaîne d’abattage avec une blessure à la poitrine. Ces animaux vont essayer désespérément de se redresser, incapables de comprendre ce qui leur arrive. (Grandin 2003). ”(31)

« Les poissons placés sur la glace mettent jusqu’à 15 minutes pour perdre connaissance, mourant finalement par suffocation. Cela signifie que les poissons peuvent être conscients lorsque leurs ouïes sont coupées. » (32)

Gross nous informe que les porcs ne sont pas les seuls animaux à reprendre conscience au cours du processus d’abattage. Lorsque nous prenons conscience des pénibles réalités de la consommation de produits d’alimentation à base d’animaux, nous comprenons pourquoi Métropolite Kallistos décrit son expérience de l’élevage intensif comme non chrétienne et ses gains financiers comme un « profit pervers ». Une question qui reste à résoudre est de savoir où est la compassion, la justice, la miséricorde et l’intégration dans notre communauté demandées par le patriarche œcuménique, pour les animaux utilisés dans ces systèmes ?

Après avoir exposé dans mon livre “an Eastern Orthodox theory of love and compassion to all creatures” (“Une théorie orthodoxe orientale de l’amour et de la compassion envers toutes les créatures”), nous devons à nouveau demander si nous devons l’appliquer aux animaux dans l’industrie de la production alimentaire. Là encore, si la réponse est non, nous devrions examiner pourquoi nous avons choisi d’exclure des trillions d’animaux de notre inclusion dans notre révolution spirituelle. Si la réponse est oui, nous devons nous demander comment appliquer les enseignements sur l’extension de notre communauté, la justice et les droits des animaux au sein de ces systèmes. Ce ne sera pas facile, car ceux qui utilisent de telles pratiques ou consomment ses produits doivent accepter que des changements sont nécessaires.

Dans le cadre de cette partie de la discussion, il ne semble n’y avoir que deux solutions :

a) les industries de production d’aliments pour animaux cessent de reproduire un grand nombre d’animaux.

b) Les consommateurs réduisent ou s’abstiennent de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, réduisant ainsi la demande, le nombre d’animaux élevés, les dommages environnementaux qu’ils causent et la souffrance globale subie.

La première semble improbable puisque l’industrie répond aux demandes du consommateur et réalise d’énormes profits. La solution semble donc appartenir au consommateur. C’est là que les dirigeants de notre Église peuvent jouer un rôle important. Si les individus étaient encouragés à s’abstenir ou à réduire leur consommation de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, cela constituerait à la fois un moyen efficace et immédiat de réduire la demande, les souffrances des animaux et les dommages causés à l’environnement et à la santé humaine. En fondant l’argument sur la probabilité que les gens choisissent l’intérêt personnel au détriment de l’altruisme, les chrétiens accepteront peut-être davantage cet enseignement s’ils connaissent les problèmes de santé associés à un régime alimentaire basé sur les animaux. Bien que ces informations soient généralement disponibles via les professions de la santé et les médias, l’Église joue également un rôle important. Les enseignements patristiques témoignent de la destruction de la création de Dieu à cause des passions humaines et un exemple fréquent est l’amour égocentrique de la gourmandise. Saint Grégoire offre des conseils :

“Utilisez, mais ne faites pas un mauvais usage… Ne vous laissez pas aller à une frénésie de plaisirs. Ne faites pas de vous un destructeur de tout ce qui est vivant, qu’il soient quadrupèdes petits ou grands, petit ou grand, oiseaux, poisson, exotique ou commun, bon marché ou onéreux. La sueur du chasseur ne doit pas vous remplir l’estomac tel un puits sans fond que beaucoup d’hommes qui creusent ne peuvent jamais remplir. »(33)

Une question qui se pose ici est de savoir si la gourmandise est un péché, le fait de tuer des animaux pour nourrir cette gourmandise est-il aussi un péché ? L’utilisation du langage négatif par St. Grégoire pour décrire le processus : pillages, éradications, hédonistes astucieux, peut indiquer que tel est le cas. Alors que Saint Jean Chrysostome ne désigne pas spécialement la nourriture dans ce qui suit, il reconnaît le lien entre nourriture et mauvaise santé :

« N’observez-vous » pas chaque jour des milliers de pathologies liées à des tables surchargées et à une alimentation immodérée ? » (34)

Russell (1980) nous informe que :

« Le contrôle de l’appétit n’était jamais terminé. il est instructif de dire que c’est la gourmandise autant que la sexualité qui était leur champ de bataille continu. »(35)

Beaucoup de gens ignorent les effets néfastes de la consommation de produits d’origine animale sur la santé. Cela est dû en partie aux sommes considérables utilisées pour commercialiser des produits d’origine animale comme étant sains. Pourtant, lorsque nous examinons les recherches sur l’alimentation et les problèmes de santé, nous constatons une corrélation directe entre l’adoption de régimes à base d’animaux dans les pays en développement et les problèmes de santé en occident, qui incluent l’obésité. Au Royaume-Uni, l’obésité a plus que triplé au cours ces 25 dernières années avec près d’un tiers des adultes et un quart des enfants obèses. Les experts en santé estiment que l’obésité est en rapport avec un large éventail de problèmes de santé, notamment à certains cancers. Diabète ; maladie cardiaque ; hypertension artérielle ; arthrite ; infertilité ; indigestion ; calculs biliaires ; stress, anxiété, dépression ; ronflement et l’apnée du sommeil.

La consommation de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux est la norme dans bien des cultures et, malgré les nombreuses mises en garde relatives à la santé associées aux produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, un grand nombre de personnes continuent à s’en nourrir. Encore une fois, nous voyons l’importance du travail de Kahneman. Les attitudes vis-à-vis du régime ne seront pas faciles à changer sans éducation. Certes, une telle éducation devrait être continue dans les écoles et les collèges ; Cependant, il s’agit ici d’un autre domaine dans lequel les dirigeants de l’Église peuvent jouer un rôle important.

Passons maintenant aux implications sotériologiques (liées au salut de l’âme) de nos actions. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée offre une certain éclairage sur la question. Il commence par énumérer les catastrophes environnementales telles que les explosions nucléaires, les déchets radioactifs, les pluies toxiques et les déversements d’hydrocarbures polluants, puis, exceptionnellement, il ajoute une forme de maltraitance animale à la liste :

« Nous pouvons aussi penser au gavage forcé des animaux afin qu’ils nous fournissent plus de nourriture. Tout cela constitue un renversement insolent de l’ordre naturel. »(36)

Il s’agit d’un enseignement rare et essentiel concernant l’angle de la souffrance animale basé sur la production d’aliments d’origine animale. Sa reconnaissance de la violence et des processus de production inhumains impliqués est une reconnaissance claire du fait que le gavage forcé des animaux est un exemple d’exploitation de « la nature ». Son langage nous rappelle le langage réprobateur de St Grégoire dans son enseignement sur « Usez ; n’abusez pas ! »Il reconnaît également les effets pervers du renversement insolent de l’ordre naturel sur la santé humaine :

« En effet, il est généralement admis que la perturbation de l’ordre naturel a des effets négatifs sur la santé et le bien-être de l’homme, tels que les fléaux contemporains de l’humanité, le cancer, le syndrome de fatigue post-virale, les maladies cardiaques, les angoisses. et une multitude d’autres maladies (37). »

Sa reconnaissance du lien qui existe entre les pratiques d’exploitation de produits alimentaires et les dommages causés à la santé animale et à la santé humaine revêt également une importance capitale, car elle souligne l’interdépendance du monde créé. La question qui se pose ici est de savoir s’il a identifié ces processus comme des péchés ? Une question morale et éthique connexe et tout aussi difficile est de savoir s’il est juste de tuer des animaux innocents dans le cadre de la recherche médicale pour traiter des troubles résultant de cette forme d’auto-indulgence humaine. L’enseignement de Sa Sainteté Bartholomée sur l’exploitation de la nature par l’humanité de « manière avare et contre nature » peut nous aider à répondre à cette question. Je soutiens que ces pratiques indiquent non seulement le désir de réaliser un profit pervers, mais également l’arrogance humaine persistante et le mauvais usage pervers de notre liberté.

L’enseignement sur le renversement de l’ordre naturel s’applique également à un autre aspect de la souffrance animale, à savoir la perte de liberté. Les animaux gardés dans des enclos ou des cages sont limités dans leurs mouvements et leurs comportements naturels. Les exemples incluent la gestation et les casiers à veaux ; « en batterie » et cages confinées ; petites cages ou enclos pour animaux à fourrure ou animaux sauvages gardés à des fins de curiosité et de divertissement. Garder les animaux dans ces conditions provoque une détresse physiologique et psychologique et une mauvaise santé. Il semble donc raisonnable d’inclure son exemple spécifique de gavage forcé des animaux et mes ajouts à celui-ci, à titre d’autres exemples de péchés contre les animaux. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée évoque également les conséquences sotériologiques négatives pour ceux qui, par leur inaction et / ou leur utilisation des produits, font partie du problème :

« Nous partageons tous la responsabilité de telles tragédies, car nous tolérons ceux qui en sont immédiatement responsables et acceptons une partie des fruits résultant d’un tel abus de la nature. » (38)

En appliquant son enseignement à notre thème, je peux affirmer que, bien que nous ne devons pas tuer ou élever les animaux de manière inhumaine, par notre demande de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, de vêtements en fourrure ou de divertissements, nous faisons partie de la raison pour laquelle de telles pratiques et processus existent. Nous créons essentiellement la demande et le marché. Une analogie utile est la détention de biens volés. Le défi de passer de la théorie à la pratique demeure.


Un rôle pour l’église.

L’Orthodoxie Orientale enseigne la nécessité d’une révolution spirituelle et l’extension de la justice, des droits, de la miséricorde, de la compassion, de la non-violence et de l’inclusion de la nature dans notre communauté. Nous devons également être une « voix pour les sans-voix », ce qui indique que nous devons agir de manière à réduire les souffrances des animaux. Que devons-nous donc dire, en tant que chrétiens orthodoxes d’Orient et de l’Église, lorsque nous apprenons que des animaux souffrent à la fois dans l’élevage et la mort d’animaux au sein de ces systèmes ? Limouris parle de la question de relier notre devoir chrétien afin d’identifier les injustices, ce qui nous ramène au sacrifice personnel :

« Les hommes et les femmes chrétiens doivent aussi avoir le courage de mettre en lumière les injustices qu’ils constatent, même si cela leur impose de faire des sacrifices personnels. Ces sacrifices peuvent comprendre de coûteuses implications et actions. »(39)

« Nous devons nous repentir des abus que nous avons infligés au monde naturel… Nous devons travailler et faire pression de toutes les manières possibles… Pour nous, cela signifie un réengagement envers la vie simple qui se contente du nécessaire et… une nouvelle affirmation de l’auto-discipline, un renouveau de l’esprit d’ascèse. »(40)

« Cependant, les mots – et même les attitudes modifiées – ne suffiront plus. Où que nous nous trouvions, en tant que chrétiens, nous devons agir pour restaurer l’intégrité de la création. Un plan d’action créatif, coopératif, actif et déterminé est requis pour la mise en œuvre. »(41)

Si c’est notre devoir chrétien individuel d’identifier les injustices et d’agir pour les prévenir, il semble raisonnable de conclure que cela devrait incomber aux responsables de l’Église. Quelles sont alors les possibilités pour nous en tant qu’individus et dirigeants de notre Église ? Changer les attitudes de ceux qui dirigent ces processus industriels sera difficile, voire impossible, sans une intervention de l’extérieur. C’est un domaine dans lequel les dirigeants de l’Eglise orthodoxe orientale pourraient jouer un rôle important, tout comme ils l’ont fait dans le cadre de leur engagement en faveur de la protection de l’environnement. En voici des exemples : les colloques sur l’environnement consacrés à la religion et aux sciences par Sa Sainteté Bartholomée ; sa visite au Forum économique mondial de Davos et sa récente action coordonnée avec le pape François, réunissant chacun des dirigeants d’entreprises, de scientifiques et d’universitaires à Rome et à Athènes, respectivement, afin d’accélérer la transition des combustibles fossiles vers des énergies renouvelables sûres. Par conséquent, il est également possible de mettre en place ce type d’action coordonnée pour discuter de l’impact sur l’environnement d’un régime alimentaire à base d’animaux.

Dans mon livre, nous apprenons que certains responsables commencent à définir la cruauté, les abus et l’exploitation des animaux dans les industries alimentaires basées sur les animaux comme un péché et un abus de la liberté humaine. Nous avons également l’enseignement suivant de l’abbé Khalil :

« Les chrétiens doivent éviter autant que possible de manger de la viande par compassion pour les animaux et prendre soin de la création. » (42)

Je suis végétalienne / végétarienne depuis 50 ans et je n’avais jamais essayé de « convertir » d’autres à ce régime. Les temps ont changé. Nous devons tous nous exprimer pour faire face à la catastrophe très réelle et imminente de la montée des changements climatiques. Dans mes travaux, j’ai maintes fois soutenu que l’abstinence des produits alimentaires à base d’animaux était un élément crucial pour réduire efficacement les souffrances des animaux, la dégradation de l’environnement et le réchauffement de la planète. En définissant le péché d’exploitation et d’abus dans les pratiques contemporaines de production alimentaire basée sur les animaux, les dirigeants de notre Église réaffirmeraient également l’enseignement de Christ dans Luc 14 : 5 et la tradition de l’Église primitive selon laquelle nous devrions agir pour empêcher les souffrances des créatures de Dieu non-humaines. Je soutiens qu’il sera également efficace de faire progresser notre voyage spirituel vers la ressemblance envers un Dieu aimant et compatissant.

Je suis encouragée par le fait que ceux qui ont du pouvoir nous demandent de représenter les sans-voix et que le débat environnemental orthodoxe oriental préconise des actions plutôt que des paroles. Ce processus a débuté par le biais de discussions orthodoxes orientales sur des questions environnementales et je soumets respectueusement que ces discussions doivent maintenant s’étendre aux domaines de la souffrance animale découlant du même état d’esprit de domination sur le monde naturel. Je suis également encouragé par les enseignements sur les implications sotériologiques négatives pour ceux qui infligent des abus, ceux qui y sont indifférents et ceux qui savent, sont concernés mais n’agissent pas pour réduire les souffrances. Je répète l’important enseignement de Sa Sainteté Bartholomée sur la nécessité d’agir :

« Nous sommes tous douloureusement conscients de l’obstacle fondamental auquel nous sommes confrontés dans notre travail en faveur de l’environnement. C’est précisément cela : comment passer de la théorie à l’action, du mot aux actes. »(43)

Une partie de ce processus nécessite que nous soyons attentifs à notre langage. Si nous désignons continuellement les animaux sous des termes tels qu’« environnement », « nature » ou « ressources », il est peu probable que la majorité des laïcs les considèrent jamais comme faisant partie de notre communauté, dignes de justice, de droits et de miséricorde et considérez-les comme dignes de notre amour et de notre compassion. Commençons plutôt par les appeler des animaux ou, mieux encore, des vaches, des moutons, des poules, etc., afin de faciliter le processus de les voir comme des êtres individuels aimés de Dieu, plutôt que comme des unités de production ou de vie disponible.

La description par Sherrard de notre psychose collective – notre marche continue vers l’abîme, indique que nous n’avons pas suffisamment compris les enseignements orthodoxes orientaux et que les dirigeants de notre Église et nos universitaires doivent remédier à cet échec. Une partie de ce processus consistera à faire en sorte que nos prêtres et nos laïcs comprennent les enseignements orthodoxes orientaux relatifs à la souffrance animale. Pour que cela se produise, nous avons besoin que nos dirigeants s’engagent sur le sujet. Il a apparemment été difficile pour les dirigeants de l’Église chrétienne de préconiser un régime végétalien/végétarien. Cette forme de régime est presque l’équivalent d’un jeûne strict et permanent, qui exige des sacrifices quotidiens. Certains ont fait valoir que nous devrions promouvoir le jeûne orthodoxe et je conviens que si tout le monde l’acceptait, cela aiderait certainement. Mais nous avons peu de temps. Les scientifiques nous ont donné environ 12 ans pour « faire demi-tour ». Nous devons être réalistes. La question qui se pose est donc de savoir dans quelle mesure est-il réaliste d’attendre des autres qu’ils adoptent le compliqué système du jeûne orthodoxe ? Cela dit, l’Eglise orthodoxe a néanmoins un rôle important à jouer. Le concept de sacrifice est étranger à beaucoup de sociétés contemporaines, mais c’est précisément là que les dirigeants de l’Eglise orthodoxe orientale jouent leur rôle. L’Orthodoxie Orientale possède la tradition ascétique et donc le pouvoir de promouvoir un régime alimentaire qui exige des sacrifices quotidiens, contrairement aux autres religions chrétiennes, aux éthiciens laïcs ou aux environnementalistes. Afin de faciliter cette possibilité, je termine ma discussion sur le régime à base d’animaux en présentant quelques propositions concrètes :

1) Les dirigeants orthodoxes pourraient exhorter les chrétiens orthodoxes et les non-croyants à abandonner totalement les régimes à base d’animaux ou, dans un premier temps, à s’abstenir d’aliments produits dans le cadre de pratiques d’élevage intensives. Ce faisant, l’impact sur la souffrance des animaux, la santé humaine et les dommages environnementaux serait énorme.

2) Si nos patriarches et évêques déclaraient leur intention de ne pas consommer ni fournir de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux lors de leurs réunions, cela enverrait un message fort et attirerait l’esprit des clercs et des laïcs.

3) Nos dirigeants pourraient affirmer comme péché le fait d’infliger un préjudice à la création animale de Dieu dans le but de réaliser des profits toujours croissants.

Pour changer la conception des animaux en tant que “vies jetables”, il est essentiel que nos prêtres soient informés des nombreux problèmes liés aux industries de la production d’aliments à base d’animaux. Les modules de séminaire peuvent être adaptés à partir du cadre modulaire, décrit à l’annexe B de mon livre. Une telle formation permettrait à nos prêtres d’enseigner un message cohérent qui conduira à la réduction de la souffrance animale, à l’amélioration de notre santé et de notre environnement et à l’avancement de nos voyages spirituels. J’ai été invité à prendre la parole au prochain sommet d’Istanbul, où je devrai « inspirer » les dirigeants de nos séminaires et de nos académies à l’inclusion d’un module sur les soins de l’environnement et des animaux. Je demande vos prières pour cet important travail.

Afin de faciliter encore ce qui précède, la fondation caritative “Pan-Orthodoxe Concern for Animals” travaille dans un contexte œcuménique afin de créer un cadre éthique pour guider la politique et la pratique des églises et autres institutions chrétiennes en matière de bien-être des animaux d’élevage. Cette initiative vise à développer des ressources et à travailler avec les institutions pour soutenir le développement et la mise en œuvre de politiques dans ce domaine. La reconnaissance de l’engagement de l’Église orthodoxe orientale dans de telles initiatives envoie un message clair aux laïcs et aux manufacturiers qu’il est temps de changer leurs pratiques.

Enfin, pour être clair, je n’affirme pas que tous les travailleurs de cette industrie sont des personnes cruelles ou diaboliques, bien qu’il existe de nombreux cas recensés de personnes présentant de telles tendances. Ce que je dis, c’est que le système lui-même est une forme de violence légalisée à l’égard des animaux qui contribue au changement climatique, à la mauvaise santé humaine et à la souffrance des animaux, répétant ainsi la disharmonie cosmique évoquée par les pères de l’Église primitive. Je soutiens que cela est incompatible avec les enseignements anciens et contemporains de l’Église orthodoxe orientale et qu’il convient donc de le rejeter.

Reférences :
 1. Luc 14 : 5.

2. Irénée, contre les hérésies, 2,2 : 5 ; 4.18.6. 3 Cyril de Jérusalem, Homélies catéchétiques, 13 : 2 ; voir aussi 13h35 et 15h :

3. Notez le point de vue de Cyril de Jérusalem sur l’intendance, Homélies catéchétiques, Homélie 15:26 ; aussi, Mt 5:16.

4.Basil, Hexaemeron 7 : 5.

5. H. A. H. Bartholomew. https://www.patriarchate.org/-/address-by-his-all-holiness-ecumenical-patriarch-bartholomew-to-the-scholars-meeting-at-the-phanar-janvier-5-2016-.

6. Harakas, ‘Ecological Reflections on Contemporary Orthodox Thought in Greece.” (“Réflexions écologiques sur la pensée orthodoxe contemporaine en Grèce”). Epiphany Journal 10 (3) : 57.

7. Métropolite Kallistos interview Ch. 6, dans Nellist. C. “Christianity and Animal Suffering : Ancient Voices in Modern Theology” (“Le christianisme orthodoxe oriental et la souffrance animale : les voix anciennes dans la théologie moderne”), Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018.

8. Résumée par Clément d’Alexandrie sous le titre ‘Harmony of the parts of the soul’ (“Harmonie des parties de l’âme”), Clément d’Alexandrie, Stromateis, 4.26 ; également, Harakas, « The Integrity of Creation », 76.

9. Harakas, « L’intégrité de la création : enjeux éthiques » dans La justice, la paix et l’intégrité de la création : le point de vue de l’orthodoxie (“The Integrity of Creation : Ethical Issues” in, Justice Peace and the Integrity of Creation : Insights from Orthodoxy”) , publié par L. Gennadios, p. 70-82. Genève : COE, 1990 : 77.

10. Bonhoeffer, éthique. Ed. E. Bethge. Traduit par N, Horton Smith. London & NY : SCM Press, 1978 : 176.

11. Bartholomew, (“Gardien de l’Environnement” (« Caretaker of the Environment »), 30 juin 2004. http://www.ec-patr.org.

12. Bartholomew, Encountering the Mystery : Understanding Orthodox Christianity Today : His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew” (“à la découverte du mystère : comprendre le christianisme orthodoxe aujourd’hui : Sa Sainteté le patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée”). New York, Londres, Toronto, Sydney, Auckland : Doubleday. 2008 : 107 ; aussi, Chryssavgis, Dire la vérité, 297 ; Rencontré. John, « L’homme prêtre de la création ».

13. Bartholomew, ” “Justice : Environmental and Human” composed as “Foreword” to proceedings of the fourth summer seminar at Halki in June (1997) (« Justice : Environmentale and Humaine »), composé comme « Avant-propos » des débats du quatrième séminaire d’été tenu à Halki en juin 1997 dans Chryssavgis, Parler de la vérité, 173 ; ainsi que “Environmental Rights” (« Droits de l’environnement ») dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, 260.

14. Bartholomew “The Orthodox Church and the Environment” (« L’Église orthodoxe et l’environnement ») dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, 2009 : 364

15. Métropolite. Kallistos (Ware) “Orthodox Christianity : Compassion for Animals’ (« Le christianisme orthodoxe : la compassion pour les animaux »), communication présentée à la conférence IOTA, Iasi, Roumanie, 2019. Voir également “The Routledge Handbook of Religion and Animal Ethics” ( “le manuel Routledge sur la religion et l’éthique animale”), publié par A. Linzey et C. Linzey, Routledge, 2018

16. Ibid.

17. Barthélemy, “Sacrifice : The Missing Dimension” (« Sacrifice : La dimension manquante ») dans Cosmic Grace, 2008 : 275.

18. Ibid.

19. Bartholomew, “Address before the Twelfth Ordinary General Assembly,” in Speaking the Truth (« Allocution avant la douzième Assemblée générale ordinaire », dans Parler de la vérité), 2011 : 283.

20. Keselopoulos, “Man and the Environment : A Study of St. Symeon the New Theologian” (“l’homme et l’environnement : une étude de saint Syméon, le nouveau théologien”), trad. E. Theokritoff. Crestwood, NY : SVSP, 2001 : 93.

21. Keselopoulos “The Prophetic Charisma in Pastoral Theology : Asceticism, Fasting and the Ecological Crisis” (« Le charisme prophétique dans la théologie pastorale : ascétisme, jeûne et crise écologique ») dans “Toward Ecology of Transfiguration : Orthodox Christian Perspectives on Environment, Nature and Creation” (“Vers l’écologie de la transfiguration : perspectives chrétiennes orthodoxes sur l’environnement, la nature et la création, eds. Chryssavgis J. et B. V. Foltz, NY : Fordham University Press, 2013 : 361.

22. Keselopoulos dans Chryssavgis & Foltz, p 361-2

23. Voir les derniers rapports du GIEC, de l’OMM et de la NASA et de la dernière édition de The Lancet.

24. Zizioulas, ‘Comments on Pope Francis’ Encyclical Laudato Si’’(« Commentaires sur l’encyclique Laudato Si du Pape François ». Disponible à : https://www.patriarchate.org/-/a-comment-on-pope-francis-encyclical-laudato-si-.

25. Métropolite Antoine (Bloom) Encounter, 135.

26. Métropolite Kallistos, Ch. 6 in, Nellist, C. “Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Animal Suffering : Ancient Voices in Modern Theology” (“Le christianisme orthodoxe oriental et la souffrance animale : Les voix anciennes dans la théologie moderne”). 2018.

27. Knight A, “Animal Agriculture and Climate Change” in, The Global Guide to Animal Protection (« Agriculture animale et changement climatique » dans le “Guide mondial de la protection des animaux”), éd. A. Linzey, p. 254-256. Urbana, Chicago and Springfield : University of Illinois Press (Presses de l’Université de l’Illinois), 2013 ; aussi dans Nellist op. cit., p. 250-1.

28. Broom et Fraser : Farm Animal Behaviour and Welfare (Comportement et bien-être des animaux de ferme) . (NY : CABI Publishing, 1997 ; Turner, Stop, Look, Listen : Recognising the Sentience of Farm Animals, (A Report for Compassion in World Farming. 2006 ; Duncan ‘Animal Welfare Issues in the Poultry Industry : Is There a Lesson to Be Learned’, Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, 2001 ; Webster, “Welfare Implications of Avian Osteoporosis.” Poultry Science 83 (2004), pp. 184-92 ; G. Stokka, J.Smith and J. Dunham, Lameness in Dairy Cattle, (Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 1997). (Turner : Stop,écoutez, : reconnaître la sensibilité des animaux d’élevage, Un rapport intitulé Compassion in World Farming. 2006 ; Problèmes de bien-être animal de Duncan ’dans l’industrie de la volaille : faut-il un enseignement ’, Revue de la science appliquée sur le bien-être des animaux, 2001 ; Webster, « Répercussions sur le bien-être de l’ostéoporose aviaire », Poultry Science 83 (2004), p. (Station d’expérimentation agricole de la Kansas State University, 1997), disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.bookstore.ksre.k-state.edu/Item.aspx?catId=567&pubId=672 ; T. Vernelli, “The Dark Side of Dairy” (“La face sombre de l’industrie laitière”) – Rapport sur l’industrie laitière britannique, 2005. Disponible sur : http://milkmyths.org.uk/pdfs/dairy_report.pdf ; Commission européenne, 1995, 2001, 2012 ; Aaltola, Animal Suffering : Philosophy and Culture (Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave, 2012 : 34 à 45). Aaltola fournit de nombreux autres rapports et études scientifiques qui décrivent de nombreux exemples de Souffrance.

29. Duncan, 2001 : 216.

30. Duncan, 2001 : 211. Voir également Gregory et Wilkins, “Broken Bones in Domestic Fowl : Handling and Processing Damage in End-of-Lay Battery Hens.” (“« Des os brisés chez les oiseaux domestiques : manipulation et traitement des dommages chez les poules en fin de ponte. ») ; Weeks & Nicol, “Poultry Handling and Transport” (« Manipulation et transport de la volaille ») ; Webster, “Welfare Implications of Avian Osteoporosis.” (« Conséquences de l’ostéoporose aviaire sur le bien-être social »).

31. Grandin, T. ‘The welfare of pigs during transport and slaughter’ (« Le bien-être des porcs pendant le transport et l’abattage »), Pig News and Information, 24 : 3, 83-90. Ceux qui suivent le judaïsme et l’islam abattent encore des animaux selon la tradition biblique. Une enquête cachée récente a mis en lumière les actions inhumaines et les souffrances immenses des animaux : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5456263/Men-chanted-tribal-style-dance-killed-sheep-spared-jail.html ; également, http://www.ciwf.org.uk/news/2013/05/illegal-slaughter-of-animals-in-cyprus/.

32. Lymbery, ‘In Too Deep : The Welfare of Intensively Farmed Fish’ (“Dans les profondeurs : le bien-être des poissons d’élevage intensif”), disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://www.eurocbc.org/fz_lymbery.pdf.

33. Saint Grégoire de Nysse, “On Love for the Poor” (“De l’amour pour les pauvres”), 57.

34. Saint Jean Chrysostome, “On Repentance and Almsgiving” (“Sur le repentir et l’aumône”), 10.5, 130.

35. Russell, The Lives of the Desert Fathers (“La vie des pères du désert”), Oxford. Mowbray & Kalamazoo, MI : Cistercian Publications, 1981 : 37.

36. « Message by H. A. H (His All Holiness). Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew upon the Day of Prayer for the Protection of Creation,” (de Sa Sainteté le Patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée à l’occasion du jour de prière pour la protection de la création », 1er septembre 2001, dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, p. 56.

37. Ibid.

38. The acceptance of stolen goods makes the point. ( Faire le point sur l’acceptation des biens volés ). ““Message by H. A. H. Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew upon the Day of Prayer for the Protection of Creation” (“Message de Sa Sainteté le Patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée à l’occasion du Jour de prière pour la protection de la création”), 1er septembre 2001, dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, p 57.

39. Limouris “Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation : Insights from Orthodoxy” (“Justice, paix et intégrité de la création : aperçus de l’orthodoxie”), 1990 : 24, no 30.

40. Ibid., 12, no 37.

41. Ibid., 12, no 38.

42. Abba Khalil, conversation privée, 15 avril 2018. Utilisé avec permission.

43. Barthélemy, “Sacrifice : The Missing Dimension”, (« Sacrifice : La dimension manquante »), dans Cosmic Grace, p. 275.

Dr. Christina Nellist, est une chercheuse invitée (Visiting Fellow) et chercheuse à l’Université de Winchester, rédactrice en chef de Pan Orthodox Concern for Animals. (“Préoccupation orthodoxe universelle pour les animaux”) Courriel : panorthodoxconcernforanimals chez gmail.com.

THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE INTERCONNECTION OF CLIMATE CHANGE, FOOD CHOICES AND ANIMAL SUFFERING

La tradition vivante de l’Église orthodoxe orientale
trad. Jean-Marc Noyelle

This is a revised version of my article in the latest edition of the International Journal of Orthodox Theology and part of my book Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Animal Suffering: Ancient Voices in Modern Theology. This formed the basis of my recent presentation at the IOTA conference in Romania in January 2019. 
Dr. Christina Nellist, has just concluded a Visiting Fellow position at the University of Winchester and is now Editor of Pan Orthodox Concern for Animals.

Certains pourraient soutenir que les sujets abordés dans cet article ne relèvent pas du discours théologique ou éthique orthodoxe oriental. Ce n’est pas le cas. Nous avons des enseignements à la fois anciens et contemporains, qui nous donnent l’autorité nécessaire pour aborder ces sujets importants.

« Lequel d’entre vous, ayant un fils ou un bœuf tombé dans un puits, ne le sortira pas immédiatement un jour de sabbat ? » (Lc 14,5) (1)

“Now, among all things, our world must be hued. This is also what was done by His Word, as Scripture tells us in the book of Genesis. »(Saint Irenaeus) (2)

« Et ne vous étonnez pas que le monde entier ait été racheté ; car ce n’était pas un simple homme, mais le Fils unique de Dieu qui mourut pour lui. »(Saint Cyrille de Jérusalem) (3)

« Dieu a tout prévu, il n’a rien négligé. Son œil, qui ne dort jamais, veille sur tout. Il est présent partout et donne à chaque être le moyen de sa conservation. Si Dieu n’a pas laissé l’oursin en dehors de sa providence, ne se soucie-t-il point de vous ? »(Saint Basile) (4)

L’allocution de Sa Sainteté. Bartholomée aux érudits orthodoxes est un exemple de voix d’autorités contemporaines :

« L’orthodoxie est une foi en même temps enracinée dans le passé et simultanément une église tournée vers l’avenir. Elle se caractérise par un sens profond de continuité avec les temps et les enseignements de l’Église apostolique et de l’Église des Pères ; mais c’est aussi une Église qui puise dans son riche patrimoine pour répondre aux défis et aux dilemmes modernes. C’est précisément cette double nature qui permet à l’Orthodoxie de parler avec audace de problèmes contemporains critiques, précisément parce qu’il s’agit d’une « tradition vivante » (5).

Dans cet article, nous décrivons cette « tradition vivante » en examinant les défis actuels de la souffrance animale en ce qui concerne le changement climatique, les choix alimentaires et la production d’aliments d’origine animale. La question du choix d’un régime alimentaire est une question parmi beaucoup qui sont importantes pour des milliards d’humains à travers le monde, non seulement à cause de la souffrance animale impliquée, mais également à cause du lien qui existe entre notre choix d’un régime alimentaire à base animale et son impact significatif. sur notre environnement et la santé humaine. Une étude exhaustive de l’interconnexion de ces sujets n’est pas possible ici, car elle nécessiterait sa propre monographie. J’ai plutôt essayé d’équilibrer le besoin de faits et de réalisme plutôt que les platitudes, tout en limitant le matériel utilisé et en tenant compte de la nécessité d’être compatissant envers le lecteur. Cette discussion examine spécifiquement les implications pratiques et la souffrance animale impliquées dans notre choix de nourriture, ainsi que les implications sotériologiques (oeuvre rédemtrice du Christ pour le monde).

Une vérité qui dérange – Le sacrifice et la révolution spirituelle

Le défi permanent qui nous attend tous est de savoir comment appliquer les enseignements orthodoxes anciens et contemporains à la compassion pour « tout » dans la création et élargir notre compréhension de la communauté, de la justice, de la miséricorde et des droits envers les animaux dans le cadre du système d’élevage intensif . Stylios (1989) suggère que nous menions une « vie de justice » (6), qui est interprétée par Harakas comme « le moyen d’éviter le profit immoral, l’injustice et l’exploitation ». Cela s’aligne avec l’enseignement du Métropolite Kallistos sur les « profits pervers » et « l’utilisation immorale d’animaux » dans l’élevage intensif. Harakas affirme également que la justice est le « bon ordre » de la nature humaine (8) où la valeur inhérente de la création exige une approche responsable, « un traitement approprié » (9). En ce sens, Harakas partage les mêmes vues que Bonhoeffer (1971) (10) qui affirme que ces devoirs découlent de droits, qu’il a accordés au monde naturel. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée et Métropolite John Zizioulas expriment un point de vue similaire en nous conseillant d’élargir notre compréhension de la communauté, d’être une voix pour le reste de la création dont les droits sont violés (11) et pour étendre notre amour au monde non humain. (12) Sa Sainteté Bartholomée préconise d’étendre la justice « au-delà des êtres humains à l’ensemble de la création » :

« L’un des problèmes les plus fondamentaux à la base de la crise écologique est le manque de justice qui prévaut dans notre monde… La tradition liturgique et patristique… considère comme juste la personne compatissante qui donne librement en se servant de l’amour pour seul critère. La justice s’étend même au-delà des êtres humains à l’ensemble de la création. L’incinération des forêts, l’exploitation criminelle de ressources naturelles… tout cela constitue une expression de transgression des vertus de la justice. » (13)

Les théologiens orthodoxes orientaux ont demandé à maintes reprises à l’humanité de changer son éthique, fondée sur une théorie de la consommation continue, en une idéologie eucharistique et esthétique de l’amour, de la vertu, du sacrifice, de l’abstinence et de la purification du péché. En substance, ils nous rappellent les enseignements patristiques pour limiter et contrôler nos désirs. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée confirme l’enseignement orthodoxe concernant la mentalité préjudiciable et permanente de domination plutôt que sur celle de l’amour :

« Malheureusement, l’humanité a perdu la relation liturgique entre le Dieu créateur et la création ; au lieu de prêtres et de serviteurs, les êtres humains ont été réduits à des tyrans et à des abuseurs de la nature (14). »

« Trop souvent, il s’agit de victimes innocentes et nous devrions considérer cette souffrance imméritée avec compassion et sympathie. » (15)

En tant qu’êtres vivants, sensibles et facilement blessés, ils doivent être considérés comme un« tu », pas un« il », pour utiliser la terminologie de Martin Buber : non comme des objets à exploiter et à manipuler, mais comme des sujets, capables de joie et de chagrin. , de bonheur et d’affliction” (16).

Sa Sainteté Bartholomée utilise le mot ’nature’ pour indiquer que son enseignement intègre les animaux et corrobore l’argument selon lequel l’abus et l’exploitation des animaux ont des conséquences négatives non seulement pour les animaux victimes d’abus, sous forme de douleur physique, de souffrance et de peur psychologique, mais aussi de troubles sotériologiques (concernant le salut de l’âme) négatifs. implications pour l’humanité. Je soutiens qu’en plus des auteurs d’actes de cruauté et d’exploitation, ceux qui sont au courant de ces actes mais qui leur sont indifférents et ceux qui savent, mais craignent d’essayer en quelque sorte d’atténuer les abus, donnent en un sens une approbation tacite à ce processus et sont des accessoires des faits commis. Il déclare que pour les chrétiens orthodoxes, cet esprit ascétique « n’est pas la négation, mais une utilisation raisonnable et équilibrée du monde ». Il attire également notre attention sur la vérité qui dérange d’une dimension manquante et du besoin de sacrifice :

« Ce besoin d’esprit ascétique peut être résumé en un seul mot clé : sacrifice. C’est la dimension manquante de notre éthique environnementale et de notre action écologique. »(17)

Il clarifie ce point avec des enseignements sur l’auto-limitation de la consommation et interprète la retenue en termes d’amour, d’humilité, de maîtrise de soi, de simplicité et de justice sociale, autant d’enseignements essentiels pour notre choix de régime et les produits que nous choisissons d’ acheter. De manière cruciale, il reconnaît le problème fondamental de l’inaction et les difficultés à effectuer un changement :

« Nous sommes tous douloureusement conscients de l’obstacle fondamental auquel nous sommes confrontés dans notre travail en faveur de l’environnement. C’est précisément cela : comment passer de la théorie à l’action, du mot aux actes (18). »
“Pour que cette révolution spirituelle se produise, nous devons faire l’expérience d’une métanoïa radicale, d’une conversion des attitudes, des habitudes et des pratiques, en recherchant les moyens par lesquels nous avons mal employé ou abusé de la Parole de Dieu, des dons de Dieu et de la création de Dieu.” (19)

Ce sont des enseignements profonds qui rappellent les avertissements des prophètes d’antan. Cette révolution spirituelle est également nécessaire pour une conversion de la façon dont nous considérons les animaux et donc de la façon dont nous les traitons. Plusieurs de ses enseignements nous incitent à refléter l’ascèse des premiers pères et le besoin urgent de changements dans le comportement humain. Dans notre avidité et notre soif de profits toujours croissants, nous « subordonnons et exploitons la création avec violence et habileté ». Cela détruit non seulement la création, mais « sape également les bases et les conditions nécessaires à la survie des générations futures ». Le commentaire de Kallistos sur le « profit pervers » au chapitre six de mon livre et l’enseignement de Saint Irénée selon lesquels nous ne devons pas utiliser notre liberté comme un « manteau de méchanceté ». Cela fait également allusion à la crise environnementale, exemple moderne de la désharmonie cosmique fréquemment soulignée par les Pères, où diverses formes d’injustice polluent la terre ; où les catastrophes naturelles et la famine sont le résultat du mal que les gens ont fait et que ce mal pollue la terre et met Dieu en colère. On peut soutenir que peu de choses ont changé, car nous commençons à ressentir les conséquences dévastatrices de nos abus et de nos utilisations abusives de la création en général et des animaux en particulier. Notre incapacité à passer de la théorie à la pratique indique que nos faiblesses nous empêchent d’atteindre les idéaux chrétiens. Cependant, ce qui est différent, c’est le manque de temps pour apporter des changements importants à notre comportement.

Choix diététiques et dégradation de l’environnement

Keselopoulos (2001) aborde certains des problèmes humains et environnementaux associés au secteur de l’alimentation et du régime alimentaire à base d’animaux. Il explique que les famines en Afrique, causées par la sécheresse et la désertification, sont dues à la monoculture de produits destinés à nourrir les animaux du Nord. Le résultat en est :

“Le phénomène cynique des réserves de lait en poudre envoyées aux enfants mourants en Afrique, alors que leurs propres terres, au lieu de produire des aliments traditionnels pour un usage local, est rendu stérile par la monoculture d’aliments pour animaux destinés à nourrir le bétail européen (20)”.

C’est un point crucial. Notre mauvaise utilisation de la terre et de l’eau afin de répondre à notre désir croissant de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux a créé un déséquilibre dans le monde naturel, causant des dommages à l’homme et aux animaux. La question qui se pose ici est la suivante : est-ce un péché de continuer à utiliser ce système et ses produits une fois que nous avons pris conscience de ses effets dévastateurs ? Keselopoulos en parle clairement en liant explicitement notre utilisation des animaux comme aliment à la pratique d’un esthétisme, de la compassion et de la pitié pour le monde naturel :

« Ainsi, l’esthétisme met prophétiquement en évidence les prérequis de compassion et de pitié pour la nature et la beauté du monde. C’est ce qui peut entraver la spirale descendante dans la barbarie qui tue le règne animal en transformant génétiquement des animaux élevés pour produire du bœuf ou des produits laitiers en monstres de la nature et en rendant le sol stérile » (21).

Keselopoulos illustre non seulement la tension entre les intérêts économiques et la souffrance animale, en particulier dans les industries de production alimentaire à base d’animaux, mais aussi le fait que la pratique du jeûne limite le nombre de décès. Ce faisant, il affirme les enseignements de Sa Sainteté Bartholomée et d’autres sur la cupidité et les profits pervers ; Les enseignements de Saint Grégoire sur user de, et non mésuser de, et sur la nécessité du sacrifice. Je condense ses commentaires :

« Si toutes les motivations de ces activités humaines sont la cupidité insatiable et le désir de profits faciles, alors le jeûne, en tant que restriction volontaire des besoins humains, peut permettre à l’homme de se libérer, au moins dans une certaine mesure, de ses désirs. Il peut à nouveau découvrir son caractère primitif, qui consiste à se tourner vers Dieu, son prochain et la création, avec une disposition véritablement aimante. L’abstinence face à la viande, observée tout au long de l’année par les moines, limite le nombre de morts que nous provoquons par notre relation au monde. L’abstinence de certains aliments vise simultanément à protéger, même pendant une courte période, des animaux si cruellement dévorés par l’homme. L’esprit de jeûne que nous sommes obligés de préserver aujourd’hui dans notre culture exige de changer le cours de notre relation à la nature, passant d’une prédation assoiffée de sang à cet état de gratitude, qui constitue la marque distinctive de l’Eucharistie” (22).

Je suis d’accord avec son analyse, qui correspond aux dernières recherches scientifiques. (23) Métropolite John Zizioulas fournit un argument similaire :

« La maîtrise de la consommation des ressources naturelles est une attitude réaliste et il faut trouver des moyens de limiter le gaspillage immense de matériaux naturels. » (24)

Si cet argument est pertinent pour le gaspillage de « ressources », il est également approprié pour le gaspillage de la vie animale. J’interprète son utilisation de « ressource » comme une référence à la création inanimée, mais comme il y a, encore une fois, de la confusion sur son sens, je rappelle au lecteur la nécessité d’une plus grande attention dans le choix de notre langue. Bien que Métropolite John croyait qu’il serait irréaliste de s’attendre à ce que nos sociétés suivent un ascétisme qui fasse écho à la vie des saints, dont beaucoup étaient végétariens, des millions de personnes choisissent ce régime non violent. Ils comprennent que, même s’ils ne peuvent pas, en tant qu’individus, être en mesure de changer les pratiques abusives des industries de l’alimentation animale, ils ont la liberté de choisir le régime alternatif non violent prôné par Dieu et le font par compassion et miséricorde pour les animaux et l’environnement. Métropolite Antoine de Sourozh indique que le régime végétalien / végétarien est à imiter et la tragédie serait de ne pas le faire :

« Il est effrayant d’imaginer que l’homme appelé à diriger chaque être sur le chemin de la transfiguration, vers la plénitude de la vie, en arriva au point qu’il ne pouvait plus monter vers Dieu et qu’il était obligé de se nourrir par le meurtre de ceux qu’il aurait dû mener vers la perfection. C’est ici que se termine le cercle tragique. Nous nous trouvons dans ce cercle. Nous sommes tous encore incapables de ne vivre que pour la vie éternelle et selon la parole de Dieu, bien que les saints soient en grande partie revenus à la conception originelle de Dieu concernant l’homme. Les saints nous montrent que nous pouvons, par la prière et les efforts spirituels, nous libérer progressivement du besoin de nous nourrir de la chair des animaux et, devenir de plus en plus assimilés à Dieu, requiert de moins en moins de l’utiliser (25). »

C’est une reconnaissance importante de la part du Métropolite Antoine. Il associe le fait de manger des animaux à une perte de liberté humaine et à notre incapacité à transfigurer nos vies déchues et à monter vers Dieu. Keselopoulos affirme que le végétalisme / végétarisme brise ce cercle. Le fait que de nombreux ascètes étaient et sont végétaliens/végétariens devrait nous rappeler le choix alimentaire originel de Dieu et donc la voie alimentaire la plus appropriée à suivre. Il est important de se rappeler que, même si Dieu nous a donné une dispense pour manger de la viande, il ne nous commande ni ne nous oblige à le faire ; nous conservons la liberté de revenir au choix de Dieu. Peut-être si le Métropolite Antoine en avait plus su sur la cruauté impliquée dans la production d’aliments à base animale, il aurait peut-être également choisi de devenir végétalien/végétarien. Métropolite Kallistos reconnaît cette possibilité :

« Les méthodes telles que l’élevage industriel sont plutôt nouvelles et je pense que si davantage de personnes savaient ce qui se passait, elles pourraient bien cesser de manger de la viande… Les gens qui vivent dans des villes comme moi mangent les produits mais ne connaissent pas trop le fond du problème et je pense que si j’en savais plus sur cet arrière-plan, je pourrais peut-être devenir végétarien. »(26)

Il est intéressant de noter qu’il reconnaît également qu’il est facile de trouver des informations disponibles sur le Web, dans des rapports et des recherches, et souligne ce point évident. Alors, c’est peut-être plus que les gens ne veulent pas savoir, plutôt que de ne pas pouvoir accéder à l’information. Nous voyons ici une trace de Kahneman et de saint Paul ; nous savons quoi faire, mais choisissons de ne pas agir de la bonne manière. Si nous, en tant qu’individus ou en tant que dirigeants de notre Église, défendions un régime végétalien/végétarien non violent, cela réduirait non seulement le nombre d’animaux qui souffrent, mais également les nombreux problèmes environnementaux liés à la production d’aliments pour animaux. Notre désir croissant de consommer des produits d’origine animale a conduit à la reproduction d’un nombre d’animaux si important que de graves impacts négatifs se sont produits sur nos environnements. Knight (2013) nous fournit les informations scientifiques importantes suivantes :

En 2006, l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (Steinfeld et al.) a calculé que, lorsqu’on mesurait le dioxyde de carbone (CO2), 18% des Gaz à Effet de Serre (GES) dans le monde, soit 7,5 milliards de tonnes par an, résultaient de la production de bovins, buffles, moutons, chèvres, chameaux, chevaux, cochons et volailles. Ces émissions résultent du défrichage des terres destinées à la production d’aliments pour le bétail et au pâturage, des animaux eux-mêmes ainsi que du transport et de la transformation de produits d’origine animale. En revanche, on estime que toutes les formes de transport combinées produisent environ 13,5% des GES mondiaux. Les GES produits par la production animale sont composés de CO2, de méthane, d’oxyde nitreux et d’ammoniac. Steinfeld et ses collaborateurs ont calculé que le secteur de l’élevage est responsable de 9% des émissions de CO2 anthropiques, c’est-à-dire imputables à l’activité humaine, qui résultent principalement de la déforestation provoquée par l’empiétement des cultures fourragères et des pâturages. La production animale occupe environ 30% de la surface de la Terre et entraîne de plus en plus de déforestation, en particulier en Amérique latine. [Environ] soixante-dix pour cent des terres amazoniennes autrefois boisées ont maintenant été converties en pâturages, les cultures fourragères couvrant une grande partie du reste.

Les animaux détenus pour la production émettent 37% de méthane anthropique, ce qui représente, selon les calculs, 72 fois le Potentiel de Réchauffement Planétaire (PRP) du CO2, principalement sur la base d’une fermentation gastro-intestinale par les ruminants (notamment les vaches et les moutons). ). Ils émettent également 65% d’oxyde nitreux anthropique avec 296 fois le PRP du CO2, dont la grande majorité est libérée par le fumier. Ils émettent également 64% d’ammoniac anthropique, ce qui contribue de manière significative aux pluies acides et à l’acidification des écosystèmes.

En 2009, Goodland et Anhang ont calculé qu’au moins 22 milliards de tonnes d’émissions de CO2 imputables à la production animale n’étaient pas comptabilisées et qu’au moins 3 milliards de tonnes avaient été mal attribuées par Steinfeld et ses collègues. Les sources non comptées comprenaient la respiration du bétail, la déforestation et les sous-estimations de méthane. Ils ont conclu que la production animale représentait au moins 51% des émissions de GES dans le monde et probablement beaucoup plus. Bien que les chiffres précis restent à l’étude, il est néanmoins clair que les GES issus de la production animale constituent l’un des principaux contributeurs au changement climatique moderne. (27)

Bien que les chiffres précis restent à l’étude, il est néanmoins clair que l’impact du régime alimentaire à base d’animaux sur le réchauffement climatique continue à être sous-estimé et sous-déclaré. Il est vrai que cette situation est en train de changer, mais on se demande combien de personnes ont lu le récent rapport du GIEC et d’autres rapports qui nous donnent des informations actualisées sur ces chiffres et l’ampleur de la fonte des glaces en Antarctique, etc.

Bien que les orthodoxes n’aient pas de système légaliste, je pense que nous manquerions à notre devoir envers les laïcs et à notre rôle de « prêtre de la création » si nous ne faisons pas plus que ce n’est actuellement le cas. En utilisant l’argument de l’intérêt personnel comme facteur de motivation, nous pouvons voir en quoi l’abstinence d’un régime alimentaire à base d’animaux pourrait avoir un impact bénéfique immédiat sur le changement climatique, nos sources d’eau, notre santé et donc notre survie future. Nous n’avons pas besoin d’attendre les accords mondiaux / gouvernementaux pour effectuer des changements réels et immédiats.

Cela répond en partie aux aspects humain et environnemental de ce thème mais qu’en est-il des animaux, que savons-nous de leurs souffrances dans ces industries ? Si nous voulons, en tant qu’individus ou en tant que dirigeants de notre Église, aborder les implications théologiques et éthiques de la souffrance animale, nous devons nous familiariser avec les connaissances disponibles non seulement sur l’impact environnemental d’un régime alimentaire à base d’animaux, mais également sur les souffrances impliquées. dans les systèmes utilisés. Il y a énormément de recherche dans ce domaine et ici, je condense certaines de ces recherches tout en en référant d’autres :

Afin de répondre aux exigences de la production industrielle et de l’habitat à haute densité, les animaux sont systématiquement marqués avec des fers chauds, écornés, débecqués, équeutés et castrés sans sédation ni analgésie… les porcelets ont la queue coupée et les mâles sont castrés en écrasant ou en arrachant leurs testicules sans analgésiques, même si ces interventions provoquent une « douleur considérable » (Broom et Fraser, 1997). Il en va de même pour les agneaux… Le prix de la mutilation est élevé pour chaque animal. Les porcelets montrent des signes de douleur jusqu’à une semaine après (tremblements, léthargie, vomissements et tremblements des jambes). Chez les agneaux, les niveaux d’hormones de stress font un bond énorme et ils montrent des signes de douleur importante pendant quatre heures ou plus. Les veaux laitiers écornés présentent des douleurs pendant six heures ou plus après (Turner, 2006). Les oiseaux aussi sont mutilés sans analgésiques ; les becs sont taillés et parfois les doigts intérieurs sont également coupés. Après le débecquage, les animaux ressentent une douleur aiguë pendant environ deux jours et une douleur chronique durant jusqu’à six semaines (Duncan 2001). Comme les stocks sont nombreux, les maladies et les blessures risquent de ne pas être détectées et sont dues à une densité élevée, au manque d’espace, au manque de stimulation mentale et à l’épuisement physique. des problèmes de santé physique et mentale apparaissent rapidement (Broom et Fraser, 2007). Les veaux de boucherie sont souvent maintenus dans de minuscules enclos et attachés par le cou et succombent rapidement à un « comportement anormal et à une mauvaise santé » (Turner 2006 ; Commission européenne 1995). La production intensive d’œufs affaiblit les os et conduit à la boiterie, à l’ostéoporose et aux douloureuses fractures, car tout le calcium et les minéraux sont utilisés pour la fabrication des œufs, causant « des douleurs à la fois aiguës et chroniques »… pouvant également entraîner des hémorragies internes, la famine et finalement la mort, qui seront douloureuses et « lentes »(Webster 2004 : 184). Les vaches souffrent de mammites et de boiteries (Stokka et al, 1997) et demeurent enceintes afin de maintenir un rendement laitier élevé (Vernelli, 2005 ; Turner, 2006) .(28)

Il n’y a pas d’autre raison à ces pratiques que le désir d’accroître les profits ; le “profit diabolique” que Métropolite Kallistos décrit. Une question qui se pose ici est de savoir si la « révolution spirituelle » requise devrait s’appliquer aux animaux de ces industries. Si la réponse est non, nous devrions examiner pourquoi nous avons choisi d’exclure des trillions d’animaux de la compassion, de la miséricorde et de la justice. Si nous en concluons qu’ils n’existent que pour cet usage, alors je crois que nous risquons de maintenir une mentalité de domination, ce qui indique à son tour que seule la souffrance humaine concerne Dieu. Je soutiens que cet état d’esprit va à l’encontre des enseignements de l’Église chrétienne orthodoxe orientale et s’apparente au type d’hérésies que les pères de l’Église primitive ont eu tant de peine à surmonter.

Après avoir donné un aperçu des souffrances endurées lors de l’élevage des animaux, nous devrions également envisager leur mort. La plupart des gens croient sans doute que l’abattage d’animaux est « humain » et se pratique près de chez eux. Les recherches démontrent que même dans les pays dotés de lois strictes en matière de bien-être animal, des millions de ces êtres risquent de souffrir du processus de transport et d’abattage. Les animaux vivants sont régulièrement transportés par route, rail, mer ou air à travers les continents. Tous les organismes de bienfaisance consacrés au bien-être des animaux s’accordent à dire que le transport sur de longues distances entraîne d’énormes souffrances : surpeuplement, épuisement, déshydratation, douleur et stress. Par exemple, dans l’UE, le temps d’arriver à l’abattoir, 35 millions de poulets sont morts. L’Australie exporte environ quatre millions de moutons vivants chaque année, principalement au Moyen-Orient. Ces animaux peuvent parcourir jusqu’à cinquante heures de route avant d’entamer les trois semaines de voyage en mer et d’effectuer un autre voyage par la route dans le pays importateur. On estime que des dizaines de milliers de moutons meurent avant d’atteindre leur destination. Bien que le gouvernement australien ait mis en place un système d’assurance de la chaîne d’approvisionnement pour l’exportation, des enquêtes menées par des groupes de défense du bien-être des animaux ont révélé de terribles souffrances lors de l’abattage après exportation. Le Canada transporte des animaux de ferme à des milliers de kilomètres à l’intérieur de ses frontières et en Amérique. Les animaux peuvent faire face à des conditions exceptionnellement rudes lorsque le climat passe du froid glacial au soleil brûlant. Les camions utilisés sont souvent sans climatisation. En Inde, les bovins voyagent dans de vastes régions, seuls deux États étant légalement autorisés à abattre des vaches. Les animaux sont souvent brutalement traités et en surpeuplement durant le transport, ce qui entraîne des blessures graves et la mort. Des milliers d’animaux viennent d’Amérique du Sud et sont élevés pour la production de viande bovine en Asie et en Afrique. Ces voyages impliquent souvent des animaux qui passent des semaines en mer et aboutissent à un abattage inhumain. Cela s’ajoute aux problèmes de transport, lorsque des retards, des erreurs ou des accidents se produisent et que des milliers d’animaux meurent dans des circonstances tragiques.

La propagation des maladies est un autre facteur préoccupant. Des maladies telles que le virus de la fièvre catarrhale du mouton, la fièvre aphteuse, la grippe aviaire et la peste porcine peuvent être directement imputables au transport des animaux de ferme. Le déplacement de bétail sur de longues distances vers les marchés et les abattoirs peut propager des maladies infectieuses entre animaux d’un pays à l’autre. Les animaux peuvent voyager d’un pays à l’autre avec peu de contrôles médicaux, ce qui peut entraîner la propagation de maladies. En 2007, des bovins importés d’Europe continentale sont arrivés avec le virus de la fièvre catarrhale car ils n’avaient pas encore été testés avant le début de leur voyage. La souffrance ne se termine souvent pas à la fin du voyage. Duncan nous informe que :

« De toutes les choses que nous faisons à nos animaux à la ferme, celles que nous leur faisons 24 heures avant leur abattage réduisent au maximum leur bien-être. » (29)

Dans de nombreux pays, les animaux sont brutalement chargés, déchargés et déplacés à l’aide d’aiguillons électriques, de bâtons, de cordes, de chaînes et d’objets tranchants. Les normes d’abattage varient. Certains animaux ne sont pas suffisamment assommés ou ne sont pas assommés avant l’abattage :

« Les oiseaux comme les poulets à griller et les dindes sont tirés et traînés par les pattes et poussés dans des caisses avec une hâte extrême (jusqu’à des milliers par heure). Les luxations et les fractures sont fréquents, de même que les blessures internes et la mort. En raison de problèmes d’étourdissement, les oiseaux courent un plus grand risque de rater la machine d’étourdissement et d’entrer dans le réservoir d’échaudage vivants et conscients. »(30)

« Les techniques de saignement peuvent être médiocres, ce qui signifie que les porcs peuvent reprendre conscience en se tenant tête en bas des chaînes de la chaîne d’abattage avec une blessure à la poitrine. Ces animaux vont essayer désespérément de se redresser, incapables de comprendre ce qui leur arrive. (Grandin 2003). ”(31)

« Les poissons placés sur la glace mettent jusqu’à 15 minutes pour perdre connaissance, mourant finalement par suffocation. Cela signifie que les poissons peuvent être conscients lorsque leurs ouïes sont coupées. » (32)

Gross nous informe que les porcs ne sont pas les seuls animaux à reprendre conscience au cours du processus d’abattage. Lorsque nous prenons conscience des pénibles réalités de la consommation de produits d’alimentation à base d’animaux, nous comprenons pourquoi Métropolite Kallistos décrit son expérience de l’élevage intensif comme non chrétienne et ses gains financiers comme un « profit pervers ». Une question qui reste à résoudre est de savoir où est la compassion, la justice, la miséricorde et l’intégration dans notre communauté demandées par le patriarche œcuménique, pour les animaux utilisés dans ces systèmes ?

Après avoir exposé dans mon livre “an Eastern Orthodox theory of love and compassion to all creatures” (“Une théorie orthodoxe orientale de l’amour et de la compassion envers toutes les créatures”), nous devons à nouveau demander si nous devons l’appliquer aux animaux dans l’industrie de la production alimentaire. Là encore, si la réponse est non, nous devrions examiner pourquoi nous avons choisi d’exclure des trillions d’animaux de notre inclusion dans notre révolution spirituelle. Si la réponse est oui, nous devons nous demander comment appliquer les enseignements sur l’extension de notre communauté, la justice et les droits des animaux au sein de ces systèmes. Ce ne sera pas facile, car ceux qui utilisent de telles pratiques ou consomment ses produits doivent accepter que des changements sont nécessaires.

Dans le cadre de cette partie de la discussion, il ne semble n’y avoir que deux solutions :

a) les industries de production d’aliments pour animaux cessent de reproduire un grand nombre d’animaux.

b) Les consommateurs réduisent ou s’abstiennent de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, réduisant ainsi la demande, le nombre d’animaux élevés, les dommages environnementaux qu’ils causent et la souffrance globale subie.

La première semble improbable puisque l’industrie répond aux demandes du consommateur et réalise d’énormes profits. La solution semble donc appartenir au consommateur. C’est là que les dirigeants de notre Église peuvent jouer un rôle important. Si les individus étaient encouragés à s’abstenir ou à réduire leur consommation de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, cela constituerait à la fois un moyen efficace et immédiat de réduire la demande, les souffrances des animaux et les dommages causés à l’environnement et à la santé humaine. En fondant l’argument sur la probabilité que les gens choisissent l’intérêt personnel au détriment de l’altruisme, les chrétiens accepteront peut-être davantage cet enseignement s’ils connaissent les problèmes de santé associés à un régime alimentaire basé sur les animaux. Bien que ces informations soient généralement disponibles via les professions de la santé et les médias, l’Église joue également un rôle important. Les enseignements patristiques témoignent de la destruction de la création de Dieu à cause des passions humaines et un exemple fréquent est l’amour égocentrique de la gourmandise. Saint Grégoire offre des conseils :

“Utilisez, mais ne faites pas un mauvais usage… Ne vous laissez pas aller à une frénésie de plaisirs. Ne faites pas de vous un destructeur de tout ce qui est vivant, qu’il soient quadrupèdes petits ou grands, petit ou grand, oiseaux, poisson, exotique ou commun, bon marché ou onéreux. La sueur du chasseur ne doit pas vous remplir l’estomac tel un puits sans fond que beaucoup d’hommes qui creusent ne peuvent jamais remplir. »(33)

Une question qui se pose ici est de savoir si la gourmandise est un péché, le fait de tuer des animaux pour nourrir cette gourmandise est-il aussi un péché ? L’utilisation du langage négatif par St. Grégoire pour décrire le processus : pillages, éradications, hédonistes astucieux, peut indiquer que tel est le cas. Alors que Saint Jean Chrysostome ne désigne pas spécialement la nourriture dans ce qui suit, il reconnaît le lien entre nourriture et mauvaise santé :

« N’observez-vous » pas chaque jour des milliers de pathologies liées à des tables surchargées et à une alimentation immodérée ? » (34)

Russell (1980) nous informe que :

« Le contrôle de l’appétit n’était jamais terminé. il est instructif de dire que c’est la gourmandise autant que la sexualité qui était leur champ de bataille continu. »(35)

Beaucoup de gens ignorent les effets néfastes de la consommation de produits d’origine animale sur la santé. Cela est dû en partie aux sommes considérables utilisées pour commercialiser des produits d’origine animale comme étant sains. Pourtant, lorsque nous examinons les recherches sur l’alimentation et les problèmes de santé, nous constatons une corrélation directe entre l’adoption de régimes à base d’animaux dans les pays en développement et les problèmes de santé en occident, qui incluent l’obésité. Au Royaume-Uni, l’obésité a plus que triplé au cours ces 25 dernières années avec près d’un tiers des adultes et un quart des enfants obèses. Les experts en santé estiment que l’obésité est en rapport avec un large éventail de problèmes de santé, notamment à certains cancers. Diabète ; maladie cardiaque ; hypertension artérielle ; arthrite ; infertilité ; indigestion ; calculs biliaires ; stress, anxiété, dépression ; ronflement et l’apnée du sommeil.

La consommation de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux est la norme dans bien des cultures et, malgré les nombreuses mises en garde relatives à la santé associées aux produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, un grand nombre de personnes continuent à s’en nourrir. Encore une fois, nous voyons l’importance du travail de Kahneman. Les attitudes vis-à-vis du régime ne seront pas faciles à changer sans éducation. Certes, une telle éducation devrait être continue dans les écoles et les collèges ; Cependant, il s’agit ici d’un autre domaine dans lequel les dirigeants de l’Église peuvent jouer un rôle important.

Passons maintenant aux implications sotériologiques (liées au salut de l’âme) de nos actions. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée offre une certain éclairage sur la question. Il commence par énumérer les catastrophes environnementales telles que les explosions nucléaires, les déchets radioactifs, les pluies toxiques et les déversements d’hydrocarbures polluants, puis, exceptionnellement, il ajoute une forme de maltraitance animale à la liste :

« Nous pouvons aussi penser au gavage forcé des animaux afin qu’ils nous fournissent plus de nourriture. Tout cela constitue un renversement insolent de l’ordre naturel. »(36)

Il s’agit d’un enseignement rare et essentiel concernant l’angle de la souffrance animale basé sur la production d’aliments d’origine animale. Sa reconnaissance de la violence et des processus de production inhumains impliqués est une reconnaissance claire du fait que le gavage forcé des animaux est un exemple d’exploitation de « la nature ». Son langage nous rappelle le langage réprobateur de St Grégoire dans son enseignement sur « Usez ; n’abusez pas ! »Il reconnaît également les effets pervers du renversement insolent de l’ordre naturel sur la santé humaine :

« En effet, il est généralement admis que la perturbation de l’ordre naturel a des effets négatifs sur la santé et le bien-être de l’homme, tels que les fléaux contemporains de l’humanité, le cancer, le syndrome de fatigue post-virale, les maladies cardiaques, les angoisses. et une multitude d’autres maladies (37). »

Sa reconnaissance du lien qui existe entre les pratiques d’exploitation de produits alimentaires et les dommages causés à la santé animale et à la santé humaine revêt également une importance capitale, car elle souligne l’interdépendance du monde créé. La question qui se pose ici est de savoir s’il a identifié ces processus comme des péchés ? Une question morale et éthique connexe et tout aussi difficile est de savoir s’il est juste de tuer des animaux innocents dans le cadre de la recherche médicale pour traiter des troubles résultant de cette forme d’auto-indulgence humaine. L’enseignement de Sa Sainteté Bartholomée sur l’exploitation de la nature par l’humanité de « manière avare et contre nature » peut nous aider à répondre à cette question. Je soutiens que ces pratiques indiquent non seulement le désir de réaliser un profit pervers, mais également l’arrogance humaine persistante et le mauvais usage pervers de notre liberté.

L’enseignement sur le renversement de l’ordre naturel s’applique également à un autre aspect de la souffrance animale, à savoir la perte de liberté. Les animaux gardés dans des enclos ou des cages sont limités dans leurs mouvements et leurs comportements naturels. Les exemples incluent la gestation et les casiers à veaux ; « en batterie » et cages confinées ; petites cages ou enclos pour animaux à fourrure ou animaux sauvages gardés à des fins de curiosité et de divertissement. Garder les animaux dans ces conditions provoque une détresse physiologique et psychologique et une mauvaise santé. Il semble donc raisonnable d’inclure son exemple spécifique de gavage forcé des animaux et mes ajouts à celui-ci, à titre d’autres exemples de péchés contre les animaux. Sa Sainteté Bartholomée évoque également les conséquences sotériologiques négatives pour ceux qui, par leur inaction et / ou leur utilisation des produits, font partie du problème :

« Nous partageons tous la responsabilité de telles tragédies, car nous tolérons ceux qui en sont immédiatement responsables et acceptons une partie des fruits résultant d’un tel abus de la nature. » (38)

En appliquant son enseignement à notre thème, je peux affirmer que, bien que nous ne devons pas tuer ou élever les animaux de manière inhumaine, par notre demande de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux, de vêtements en fourrure ou de divertissements, nous faisons partie de la raison pour laquelle de telles pratiques et processus existent. Nous créons essentiellement la demande et le marché. Une analogie utile est la détention de biens volés. Le défi de passer de la théorie à la pratique demeure.


Un rôle pour l’église.

L’Orthodoxie Orientale enseigne la nécessité d’une révolution spirituelle et l’extension de la justice, des droits, de la miséricorde, de la compassion, de la non-violence et de l’inclusion de la nature dans notre communauté. Nous devons également être une « voix pour les sans-voix », ce qui indique que nous devons agir de manière à réduire les souffrances des animaux. Que devons-nous donc dire, en tant que chrétiens orthodoxes d’Orient et de l’Église, lorsque nous apprenons que des animaux souffrent à la fois dans l’élevage et la mort d’animaux au sein de ces systèmes ? Limouris parle de la question de relier notre devoir chrétien afin d’identifier les injustices, ce qui nous ramène au sacrifice personnel :

« Les hommes et les femmes chrétiens doivent aussi avoir le courage de mettre en lumière les injustices qu’ils constatent, même si cela leur impose de faire des sacrifices personnels. Ces sacrifices peuvent comprendre de coûteuses implications et actions. »(39)

« Nous devons nous repentir des abus que nous avons infligés au monde naturel… Nous devons travailler et faire pression de toutes les manières possibles… Pour nous, cela signifie un réengagement envers la vie simple qui se contente du nécessaire et… une nouvelle affirmation de l’auto-discipline, un renouveau de l’esprit d’ascèse. »(40)

« Cependant, les mots – et même les attitudes modifiées – ne suffiront plus. Où que nous nous trouvions, en tant que chrétiens, nous devons agir pour restaurer l’intégrité de la création. Un plan d’action créatif, coopératif, actif et déterminé est requis pour la mise en œuvre. »(41)

Si c’est notre devoir chrétien individuel d’identifier les injustices et d’agir pour les prévenir, il semble raisonnable de conclure que cela devrait incomber aux responsables de l’Église. Quelles sont alors les possibilités pour nous en tant qu’individus et dirigeants de notre Église ? Changer les attitudes de ceux qui dirigent ces processus industriels sera difficile, voire impossible, sans une intervention de l’extérieur. C’est un domaine dans lequel les dirigeants de l’Eglise orthodoxe orientale pourraient jouer un rôle important, tout comme ils l’ont fait dans le cadre de leur engagement en faveur de la protection de l’environnement. En voici des exemples : les colloques sur l’environnement consacrés à la religion et aux sciences par Sa Sainteté Bartholomée ; sa visite au Forum économique mondial de Davos et sa récente action coordonnée avec le pape François, réunissant chacun des dirigeants d’entreprises, de scientifiques et d’universitaires à Rome et à Athènes, respectivement, afin d’accélérer la transition des combustibles fossiles vers des énergies renouvelables sûres. Par conséquent, il est également possible de mettre en place ce type d’action coordonnée pour discuter de l’impact sur l’environnement d’un régime alimentaire à base d’animaux.

Dans mon livre, nous apprenons que certains responsables commencent à définir la cruauté, les abus et l’exploitation des animaux dans les industries alimentaires basées sur les animaux comme un péché et un abus de la liberté humaine. Nous avons également l’enseignement suivant de l’abbé Khalil :

« Les chrétiens doivent éviter autant que possible de manger de la viande par compassion pour les animaux et prendre soin de la création. » (42)

Je suis végétalienne / végétarienne depuis 50 ans et je n’avais jamais essayé de « convertir » d’autres à ce régime. Les temps ont changé. Nous devons tous nous exprimer pour faire face à la catastrophe très réelle et imminente de la montée des changements climatiques. Dans mes travaux, j’ai maintes fois soutenu que l’abstinence des produits alimentaires à base d’animaux était un élément crucial pour réduire efficacement les souffrances des animaux, la dégradation de l’environnement et le réchauffement de la planète. En définissant le péché d’exploitation et d’abus dans les pratiques contemporaines de production alimentaire basée sur les animaux, les dirigeants de notre Église réaffirmeraient également l’enseignement de Christ dans Luc 14 : 5 et la tradition de l’Église primitive selon laquelle nous devrions agir pour empêcher les souffrances des créatures de Dieu non-humaines. Je soutiens qu’il sera également efficace de faire progresser notre voyage spirituel vers la ressemblance envers un Dieu aimant et compatissant.

Je suis encouragée par le fait que ceux qui ont du pouvoir nous demandent de représenter les sans-voix et que le débat environnemental orthodoxe oriental préconise des actions plutôt que des paroles. Ce processus a débuté par le biais de discussions orthodoxes orientales sur des questions environnementales et je soumets respectueusement que ces discussions doivent maintenant s’étendre aux domaines de la souffrance animale découlant du même état d’esprit de domination sur le monde naturel. Je suis également encouragé par les enseignements sur les implications sotériologiques négatives pour ceux qui infligent des abus, ceux qui y sont indifférents et ceux qui savent, sont concernés mais n’agissent pas pour réduire les souffrances. Je répète l’important enseignement de Sa Sainteté Bartholomée sur la nécessité d’agir :

« Nous sommes tous douloureusement conscients de l’obstacle fondamental auquel nous sommes confrontés dans notre travail en faveur de l’environnement. C’est précisément cela : comment passer de la théorie à l’action, du mot aux actes. »(43)

Une partie de ce processus nécessite que nous soyons attentifs à notre langage. Si nous désignons continuellement les animaux sous des termes tels qu’« environnement », « nature » ou « ressources », il est peu probable que la majorité des laïcs les considèrent jamais comme faisant partie de notre communauté, dignes de justice, de droits et de miséricorde et considérez-les comme dignes de notre amour et de notre compassion. Commençons plutôt par les appeler des animaux ou, mieux encore, des vaches, des moutons, des poules, etc., afin de faciliter le processus de les voir comme des êtres individuels aimés de Dieu, plutôt que comme des unités de production ou de vie disponible.

La description par Sherrard de notre psychose collective – notre marche continue vers l’abîme, indique que nous n’avons pas suffisamment compris les enseignements orthodoxes orientaux et que les dirigeants de notre Église et nos universitaires doivent remédier à cet échec. Une partie de ce processus consistera à faire en sorte que nos prêtres et nos laïcs comprennent les enseignements orthodoxes orientaux relatifs à la souffrance animale. Pour que cela se produise, nous avons besoin que nos dirigeants s’engagent sur le sujet. Il a apparemment été difficile pour les dirigeants de l’Église chrétienne de préconiser un régime végétalien/végétarien. Cette forme de régime est presque l’équivalent d’un jeûne strict et permanent, qui exige des sacrifices quotidiens. Certains ont fait valoir que nous devrions promouvoir le jeûne orthodoxe et je conviens que si tout le monde l’acceptait, cela aiderait certainement. Mais nous avons peu de temps. Les scientifiques nous ont donné environ 12 ans pour « faire demi-tour ». Nous devons être réalistes. La question qui se pose est donc de savoir dans quelle mesure est-il réaliste d’attendre des autres qu’ils adoptent le compliqué système du jeûne orthodoxe ? Cela dit, l’Eglise orthodoxe a néanmoins un rôle important à jouer. Le concept de sacrifice est étranger à beaucoup de sociétés contemporaines, mais c’est précisément là que les dirigeants de l’Eglise orthodoxe orientale jouent leur rôle. L’Orthodoxie Orientale possède la tradition ascétique et donc le pouvoir de promouvoir un régime alimentaire qui exige des sacrifices quotidiens, contrairement aux autres religions chrétiennes, aux éthiciens laïcs ou aux environnementalistes. Afin de faciliter cette possibilité, je termine ma discussion sur le régime à base d’animaux en présentant quelques propositions concrètes :

1) Les dirigeants orthodoxes pourraient exhorter les chrétiens orthodoxes et les non-croyants à abandonner totalement les régimes à base d’animaux ou, dans un premier temps, à s’abstenir d’aliments produits dans le cadre de pratiques d’élevage intensives. Ce faisant, l’impact sur la souffrance des animaux, la santé humaine et les dommages environnementaux serait énorme.

2) Si nos patriarches et évêques déclaraient leur intention de ne pas consommer ni fournir de produits alimentaires à base d’animaux lors de leurs réunions, cela enverrait un message fort et attirerait l’esprit des clercs et des laïcs.

3) Nos dirigeants pourraient affirmer comme péché le fait d’infliger un préjudice à la création animale de Dieu dans le but de réaliser des profits toujours croissants.

Pour changer la conception des animaux en tant que “vies jetables”, il est essentiel que nos prêtres soient informés des nombreux problèmes liés aux industries de la production d’aliments à base d’animaux. Les modules de séminaire peuvent être adaptés à partir du cadre modulaire, décrit à l’annexe B de mon livre. Une telle formation permettrait à nos prêtres d’enseigner un message cohérent qui conduira à la réduction de la souffrance animale, à l’amélioration de notre santé et de notre environnement et à l’avancement de nos voyages spirituels. J’ai été invité à prendre la parole au prochain sommet d’Istanbul, où je devrai « inspirer » les dirigeants de nos séminaires et de nos académies à l’inclusion d’un module sur les soins de l’environnement et des animaux. Je demande vos prières pour cet important travail.

Afin de faciliter encore ce qui précède, la fondation caritative “Pan-Orthodoxe Concern for Animals” travaille dans un contexte œcuménique afin de créer un cadre éthique pour guider la politique et la pratique des églises et autres institutions chrétiennes en matière de bien-être des animaux d’élevage. Cette initiative vise à développer des ressources et à travailler avec les institutions pour soutenir le développement et la mise en œuvre de politiques dans ce domaine. La reconnaissance de l’engagement de l’Église orthodoxe orientale dans de telles initiatives envoie un message clair aux laïcs et aux manufacturiers qu’il est temps de changer leurs pratiques.

Enfin, pour être clair, je n’affirme pas que tous les travailleurs de cette industrie sont des personnes cruelles ou diaboliques, bien qu’il existe de nombreux cas recensés de personnes présentant de telles tendances. Ce que je dis, c’est que le système lui-même est une forme de violence légalisée à l’égard des animaux qui contribue au changement climatique, à la mauvaise santé humaine et à la souffrance des animaux, répétant ainsi la disharmonie cosmique évoquée par les pères de l’Église primitive. Je soutiens que cela est incompatible avec les enseignements anciens et contemporains de l’Église orthodoxe orientale et qu’il convient donc de le rejeter.

Reférences :
 1. Luc 14 : 5.

2. Irénée, contre les hérésies, 2,2 : 5 ; 4.18.6. 3 Cyril de Jérusalem, Homélies catéchétiques, 13 : 2 ; voir aussi 13h35 et 15h :

3. Notez le point de vue de Cyril de Jérusalem sur l’intendance, Homélies catéchétiques, Homélie 15:26 ; aussi, Mt 5:16.

4.Basil, Hexaemeron 7 : 5.

5. H. A. H. Bartholomew. https://www.patriarchate.org/-/address-by-his-all-holiness-ecumenical-patriarch-bartholomew-to-the-scholars-meeting-at-the-phanar-janvier-5-2016-.

6. Harakas, ‘Ecological Reflections on Contemporary Orthodox Thought in Greece.” (“Réflexions écologiques sur la pensée orthodoxe contemporaine en Grèce”). Epiphany Journal 10 (3) : 57.

7. Métropolite Kallistos interview Ch. 6, dans Nellist. C. “Christianity and Animal Suffering : Ancient Voices in Modern Theology” (“Le christianisme orthodoxe oriental et la souffrance animale : les voix anciennes dans la théologie moderne”), Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018.

8. Résumée par Clément d’Alexandrie sous le titre ‘Harmony of the parts of the soul’ (“Harmonie des parties de l’âme”), Clément d’Alexandrie, Stromateis, 4.26 ; également, Harakas, « The Integrity of Creation », 76.

9. Harakas, « L’intégrité de la création : enjeux éthiques » dans La justice, la paix et l’intégrité de la création : le point de vue de l’orthodoxie (“The Integrity of Creation : Ethical Issues” in, Justice Peace and the Integrity of Creation : Insights from Orthodoxy”) , publié par L. Gennadios, p. 70-82. Genève : COE, 1990 : 77.

10. Bonhoeffer, éthique. Ed. E. Bethge. Traduit par N, Horton Smith. London & NY : SCM Press, 1978 : 176.

11. Bartholomew, (“Gardien de l’Environnement” (« Caretaker of the Environment »), 30 juin 2004. http://www.ec-patr.org.

12. Bartholomew, Encountering the Mystery : Understanding Orthodox Christianity Today : His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew” (“à la découverte du mystère : comprendre le christianisme orthodoxe aujourd’hui : Sa Sainteté le patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée”). New York, Londres, Toronto, Sydney, Auckland : Doubleday. 2008 : 107 ; aussi, Chryssavgis, Dire la vérité, 297 ; Rencontré. John, « L’homme prêtre de la création ».

13. Bartholomew, ” “Justice : Environmental and Human” composed as “Foreword” to proceedings of the fourth summer seminar at Halki in June (1997) (« Justice : Environmentale and Humaine »), composé comme « Avant-propos » des débats du quatrième séminaire d’été tenu à Halki en juin 1997 dans Chryssavgis, Parler de la vérité, 173 ; ainsi que “Environmental Rights” (« Droits de l’environnement ») dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, 260.

14. Bartholomew “The Orthodox Church and the Environment” (« L’Église orthodoxe et l’environnement ») dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, 2009 : 364

15. Métropolite. Kallistos (Ware) “Orthodox Christianity : Compassion for Animals’ (« Le christianisme orthodoxe : la compassion pour les animaux »), communication présentée à la conférence IOTA, Iasi, Roumanie, 2019. Voir également “The Routledge Handbook of Religion and Animal Ethics” ( “le manuel Routledge sur la religion et l’éthique animale”), publié par A. Linzey et C. Linzey, Routledge, 2018

16. Ibid.

17. Barthélemy, “Sacrifice : The Missing Dimension” (« Sacrifice : La dimension manquante ») dans Cosmic Grace, 2008 : 275.

18. Ibid.

19. Bartholomew, “Address before the Twelfth Ordinary General Assembly,” in Speaking the Truth (« Allocution avant la douzième Assemblée générale ordinaire », dans Parler de la vérité), 2011 : 283.

20. Keselopoulos, “Man and the Environment : A Study of St. Symeon the New Theologian” (“l’homme et l’environnement : une étude de saint Syméon, le nouveau théologien”), trad. E. Theokritoff. Crestwood, NY : SVSP, 2001 : 93.

21. Keselopoulos “The Prophetic Charisma in Pastoral Theology : Asceticism, Fasting and the Ecological Crisis” (« Le charisme prophétique dans la théologie pastorale : ascétisme, jeûne et crise écologique ») dans “Toward Ecology of Transfiguration : Orthodox Christian Perspectives on Environment, Nature and Creation” (“Vers l’écologie de la transfiguration : perspectives chrétiennes orthodoxes sur l’environnement, la nature et la création, eds. Chryssavgis J. et B. V. Foltz, NY : Fordham University Press, 2013 : 361.

22. Keselopoulos dans Chryssavgis & Foltz, p 361-2

23. Voir les derniers rapports du GIEC, de l’OMM et de la NASA et de la dernière édition de The Lancet.

24. Zizioulas, ‘Comments on Pope Francis’ Encyclical Laudato Si’’(« Commentaires sur l’encyclique Laudato Si du Pape François ». Disponible à : https://www.patriarchate.org/-/a-comment-on-pope-francis-encyclical-laudato-si-.

25. Métropolite Antoine (Bloom) Encounter, 135.

26. Métropolite Kallistos, Ch. 6 in, Nellist, C. “Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Animal Suffering : Ancient Voices in Modern Theology” (“Le christianisme orthodoxe oriental et la souffrance animale : Les voix anciennes dans la théologie moderne”). 2018.

27. Knight A, “Animal Agriculture and Climate Change” in, The Global Guide to Animal Protection (« Agriculture animale et changement climatique » dans le “Guide mondial de la protection des animaux”), éd. A. Linzey, p. 254-256. Urbana, Chicago and Springfield : University of Illinois Press (Presses de l’Université de l’Illinois), 2013 ; aussi dans Nellist op. cit., p. 250-1.

28. Broom et Fraser : Farm Animal Behaviour and Welfare (Comportement et bien-être des animaux de ferme) . (NY : CABI Publishing, 1997 ; Turner, Stop, Look, Listen : Recognising the Sentience of Farm Animals, (A Report for Compassion in World Farming. 2006 ; Duncan ‘Animal Welfare Issues in the Poultry Industry : Is There a Lesson to Be Learned’, Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, 2001 ; Webster, “Welfare Implications of Avian Osteoporosis.” Poultry Science 83 (2004), pp. 184-92 ; G. Stokka, J.Smith and J. Dunham, Lameness in Dairy Cattle, (Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, 1997). (Turner : Stop,écoutez, : reconnaître la sensibilité des animaux d’élevage, Un rapport intitulé Compassion in World Farming. 2006 ; Problèmes de bien-être animal de Duncan ’dans l’industrie de la volaille : faut-il un enseignement ’, Revue de la science appliquée sur le bien-être des animaux, 2001 ; Webster, « Répercussions sur le bien-être de l’ostéoporose aviaire », Poultry Science 83 (2004), p. (Station d’expérimentation agricole de la Kansas State University, 1997), disponible à l’adresse suivante : https://www.bookstore.ksre.k-state.edu/Item.aspx?catId=567&pubId=672 ; T. Vernelli, “The Dark Side of Dairy” (“La face sombre de l’industrie laitière”) – Rapport sur l’industrie laitière britannique, 2005. Disponible sur : http://milkmyths.org.uk/pdfs/dairy_report.pdf ; Commission européenne, 1995, 2001, 2012 ; Aaltola, Animal Suffering : Philosophy and Culture (Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave, 2012 : 34 à 45). Aaltola fournit de nombreux autres rapports et études scientifiques qui décrivent de nombreux exemples de Souffrance.

29. Duncan, 2001 : 216.

30. Duncan, 2001 : 211. Voir également Gregory et Wilkins, “Broken Bones in Domestic Fowl : Handling and Processing Damage in End-of-Lay Battery Hens.” (“« Des os brisés chez les oiseaux domestiques : manipulation et traitement des dommages chez les poules en fin de ponte. ») ; Weeks & Nicol, “Poultry Handling and Transport” (« Manipulation et transport de la volaille ») ; Webster, “Welfare Implications of Avian Osteoporosis.” (« Conséquences de l’ostéoporose aviaire sur le bien-être social »).

31. Grandin, T. ‘The welfare of pigs during transport and slaughter’ (« Le bien-être des porcs pendant le transport et l’abattage »), Pig News and Information, 24 : 3, 83-90. Ceux qui suivent le judaïsme et l’islam abattent encore des animaux selon la tradition biblique. Une enquête cachée récente a mis en lumière les actions inhumaines et les souffrances immenses des animaux : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5456263/Men-chanted-tribal-style-dance-killed-sheep-spared-jail.html ; également, http://www.ciwf.org.uk/news/2013/05/illegal-slaughter-of-animals-in-cyprus/.

32. Lymbery, ‘In Too Deep : The Welfare of Intensively Farmed Fish’ (“Dans les profondeurs : le bien-être des poissons d’élevage intensif”), disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://www.eurocbc.org/fz_lymbery.pdf.

33. Saint Grégoire de Nysse, “On Love for the Poor” (“De l’amour pour les pauvres”), 57.

34. Saint Jean Chrysostome, “On Repentance and Almsgiving” (“Sur le repentir et l’aumône”), 10.5, 130.

35. Russell, The Lives of the Desert Fathers (“La vie des pères du désert”), Oxford. Mowbray & Kalamazoo, MI : Cistercian Publications, 1981 : 37.

36. « Message by H. A. H (His All Holiness). Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew upon the Day of Prayer for the Protection of Creation,” (de Sa Sainteté le Patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée à l’occasion du jour de prière pour la protection de la création », 1er septembre 2001, dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, p. 56.

37. Ibid.

38. The acceptance of stolen goods makes the point. ( Faire le point sur l’acceptation des biens volés ). ““Message by H. A. H. Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew upon the Day of Prayer for the Protection of Creation” (“Message de Sa Sainteté le Patriarche œcuménique Bartholomée à l’occasion du Jour de prière pour la protection de la création”), 1er septembre 2001, dans Chryssavgis, Cosmic Grace, p 57.

39. Limouris “Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation : Insights from Orthodoxy” (“Justice, paix et intégrité de la création : aperçus de l’orthodoxie”), 1990 : 24, no 30.

40. Ibid., 12, no 37.

41. Ibid., 12, no 38.

42. Abba Khalil, conversation privée, 15 avril 2018. Utilisé avec permission.

43. Barthélemy, “Sacrifice : The Missing Dimension”, (« Sacrifice : La dimension manquante »), dans Cosmic Grace, p. 275.

Dr. Christina Nellist, est une chercheuse invitée (Visiting Fellow) et chercheuse à l’Université de Winchester, rédactrice en chef de Pan Orthodox Concern for Animals. (“Préoccupation orthodoxe universelle pour les animaux”) Courriel : panorthodoxconcernforanimals chez gmail.com.

International Orthodox Theological Association: Exciting News

Conference Planning | Publication Plans |Announcements
CONFERENCE PLANNING. IOTA plans to hold its mega-conferences
every four years: 2023, 2027, 2031, and so on. Unless there are compelling reasons to make an alternative arrangement, each mega-conference will
take place in January, starting no earlier than the 8th and ending no later than the 15th of the month. Plan accordingly.

In order to prepare each mega-conference, IOTA’s group chairs will hold an international symposium two years before each mega-conference on the model of the Jerusalem Symposium of January 2018. We are happy to note that we have the blessing of the Patriarchate of Alexandria to hold
the next Chairs’ Symposium in January 2021 in Egypt. In addition, IOTA
has a standing invitation of the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew to organize its subsequent Chairs’ Symposium in Turkey. 
PUBLICATION PLANS. IOTA plans to launch its publications in 2020 with the Flagship Volume, which will include public addresses, group vision
statements, and institutional statements. IOTA Group Chairs will constitute an Advisory Committee to IOTA Publications. Individual conference
presentations have already been made available online on IOTA’s 
YouTube Channel (as videos, over 27, 000 views and 430 subscribers to
date) and on the Ancient Faith Ministries website (as podcasts).
ANNOUNCEMENTS. IOTA’s co-laborer organization, Orthodox
Theological Society in America invites papers on the topic of “Orthodox
Unity” for its annual meeting in Glenview (suburban Chicago), Illinois, on November 7-9, 2019. The deadline for the submission of the paper
proposals is September 1. Orthodox scholars residing outside of North
America are encouraged to attend as observers. For more information,
visit this page. The OTSA meeting is being held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Orthodox Christian Association of Medicine,
Psychology, and Religion (OCAMPR).
YouTube Channel (subscribe for new videos)
Podcasts of Conference Presentations
IOTA Facebook Page (subscribe for regular updates)

Multi-Organ Lab-on-a-Chip for Cancer Drug Testing

For those of you keeping up with alternatives to animal testing, this is a further development:

JUNE 20TH, 2019  CONN HASTINGS MATERIALSMEDICINE

Researchers at Hesperos, Inc., a biotech firm based in Florida, have collaborated with Roche and the University of Central Florida to develop a multi-organ lab-on-a-chip system for drug testing. The device includes human organ-derived tissue constructs that allow for the efficacy and side-effects of anti-cancer drugs in various organs to be tested in a way that does not involve laboratory animals. The technique is another step for lab-on-a-chip devices in making preclinical testing easier, less expensive, and more humane.

Lab-on-a-chip devices for drug testing are an active area of research, with numerous devices being reported in recent years. The promise of such technology is substantial, as it could drastically reduce the need for laboratory animal testing for new drug compounds and could make such testing faster and less expensive. In the future, the technology could provide drug safety and efficacy data that are more relevant to human patients than those achieved using experimental animals.

Given the enormous sums of money spent by large pharmaceutical companies on drug testing, some are taking an interest in developing such technology. Roche was involved in the research behind this latest device, which contains multiple human organ-derived tissue constructs grown on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) , and circulating serum-free medium. The device allows researchers to test the tissue response to anti-cancer drugs, either alone or in combination, and assess both efficacy and safety at the same time.

For instance, in testing the device, the researchers showed that diclofenac, an anticancer drug, inhibited the growth of cancer-derived bone marrow cells at a specific concentration, but also reduced the viability of liver cells by 30%, indicating that such a dose may not be safe for humans. Often, the primary goal of such testing is to determine the therapeutic index of a tested compound, which indicates the range of drug concentrations in which a drug can have a therapeutic effect, without causing substantial toxicity.

“This is a game changer in the preclinical drug development process, which normally requires an animal model to measure therapeutic index, and in the case of many rare diseases requires testing in humans as there are no animal models available,” said James Hickman, a researcher involved in the study. “In addition, our system will allow testing of different therapies on small samples of a specific cancer patient’s tissue to help inform doctors about which treatment works best for each individual.”

Study in Science Translational MedicineMulti-organ system for the evaluation of efficacy and off-target toxicity of anticancer therapeutics

Further studies:

We recommend

  1. Sony Backing Organ-on-Chip TechnologyGavin Corley, Medgadget, 2013
  2. Microfluidic Chip May Replace Lab Rats in Drug ExperimentsEditors, Medgadget, 2015
  3. Portable PSA Testing Anywhere Using a Lab in a BriefcaseEditors, Medgadget, 2015
  4. A Pragmatic view of Preclinical In-vivo Imaging MarketMarketDataForecast, Medgadget, 2017
  5. u2018Lab on a Chip’ for Whole-animal StudiesEditors, Medgadget, 2007
  1. The mouse: the scientist’s best friendMedical News Today, 2015
  2. First lab-grown contracting human muscleHonor Whiteman, Medical News Today, 2015
  3. Skin replacement with blood and lymphatic capillaries grown in labUnivadis (UK), 2014
  4. Liquid biopsies “routine within five years”Univadis (UK), 2016

Endangered Species: Christian Responsibility

This is a fine article by Fred Krueger . Despite the American slant, it is easily transposed to other countries. Other Patristic teachings are found on our website:

‘The abuse by contemporary man of his privileged position in creation and of the Creator’s order “to have dominion over the earth” (Genesis 1.28) has already led the world to the edge of apocalyptic self-destruction, either in the form of natural pollution which is dangerous for all living beings, or in the form of the extinction of many species of the animal and plant world…’ . HAH Ecumenical Patriarch +Dimitrios

‘For humans to cause species to become extinct and to destroy the biological diversity of God’s creation… these things are sins. ‘ . HAH Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew

‘A good steward is careful to protect the things of his Master’s house: he protects against destruction and decay. He would never permit pollution, rainforest burning, or the extinction of entire species.’ – HE Metropolitan +Nicholas of Amissos

SHOULD ORTHODOX CHRISTIANS BE CONCERNED ABOUT SAVING ENDANGERED ANIMAL SPECIES?

Critics sometimes claim that they get in the way of progress and development, and if they die out, it doesn’t really matter. There are thousands of other species. Is this a proper way for Christians to respond to this question? What is an appropriate way for Orthodox to understand the endangered species issue?

As background, let us recall that North America was originally blessed with some of the world’s most amazing wildlife. When European settlers first visited this continent they encountered Eastern elk and wood buffalo populating the forests of Appalachia; a huge 10′ to 11″ tall golden grizzly bear was in the river valleys of California; a unique jaguar roamed the Arizona desert. On the coastal waters of the Pacific the Stellar sea cow – a large 35′ relative of the Florida manatee – was hunted to extinction because of its tasty flesh. In the Atlantic the sea mink and the grey whale are now gone. In the skies, tens of millions of passenger pigeons filled the air; large flocks of colorful Carolina parakeets were in the forests, and the flightless great auk was on Atlantic islands. These creatures are all gone – extinct by the hand of a rapacious human society – as are many others including the once massive schools of salmon and steelhead that crowded western rivers; the huge flocks of ducks and geese that filled the skyways; and spectacular pods of whales that swam the oceans.

Pioneers saw this original abundance as evidence that God “shed His grace on Thee,” as the 19th century hymn “America, the Beautiful” proclaims. They arrived at this conclusion because the Scriptures repeatedly teach a respect and care for the animals. This we read in many different places in the Bible so that it becomes an inescapable conclusion for Christians.

Here are several examples from Scripture.

The Witness of the Bible on Animals.

When God created the animals – even before He created people – He gave them a divine mandate to multiply and fill the earth. They therefore have a command from God to continue their species. As humans we are to honor their responsibility to fulfill what God has commanded regarding the design of the world.

Humans are given dominion over creation, including the animals. Dominion means that we are to treat God’s creation as the Lord would treat it. (The English word “dominion” derives from the Latin word “dominus” which means Lord, or to be as the Lord.) This implies love, care and thoughtfulness as well as concern for the welfare and the future of what God has placed into human care. It does not and never did mean a simplistic domination of the animals or the earth.

God tells us to replenish the earth – which means to put back what we take. Replenishment applies to the earth and everything in it, including the animals. We may take from creation to live, but we must ensure the continued fruitfulness of the land and the species which dwell on it. The mass killing of the buffalo on the American plains or the extermination of the passenger pigeons disregarded this command to replenish the earth – i.e., to maintain its fruitfulness.

God directed Adam to name the animals. This was not an arbitrary process. In Hebrew each letter has meaning that relates back to the qualities in the nature of God. The naming of each animal required a deep discernment of its inner essences and an identification of those attributes within creatures that connect them back to their Creator. The ancient responsibility to name the creatures reminds us that humans are priests of creation, charged by God with its care and keeping, but also with an accountability for a right relationship between heaven and earth.

At the time of the Flood, God commanded Noah to save each animal species. Notice in this story that God was more concerned about saving each species than He was about saving the sinful people. After the rains fell, God allowed those people to drown who would not listen to Noah, but He ensured that the animal species were all preserved.

After the Flood God makes his covenant with Noah but also with all the animals in the ark. This covenant declares that as long as they obey God, there will not again be another great flood. If God can make covenant with Noah and his descendants in perpetuity, including the animals, His acknowledgment of them in a contractual manner means that He intends for them to survive into the future. Humans should not abrogate what God has intended by causing any species to be exterminated.

In the Psalms the author repeatedly presents images in which animals, plants, and trees coexist in a cosmic harmony. We read an epic vision in Psalm 103/104 in which there are places appointed for the animals and the Lord oversees the whole creation. The author then concludes “in wisdom hast thou made them all” (Ps. 103:24). Several lessons emerge from this sequence. As creation gives praise to God and exists in adequacy and simple sufficiency, not excess, this serves as a model for human behavior. The fact that creation is imbued with wisdom means that the order, balance, harmony, and beauty with which God has assembled the world should serve as the model and guide for how we are to structure and build human society. The implication is that we should make room for the animals and plants, and not allow their elimination.

A further implication is that wisdom is essential for a harmonious world. Because wisdom is accessed only by theosis, spiritual striving is fundamental for each person. This allows us to live consciously connected to God’s wisdom and therefore to discern and foresee the consequences that our actions have upon each other and the biotic world.

In the last book of the Bible, in the Book of Revelation, St. John the Evangelist writes that in the end, all the animals of earth and the creatures of the sea will join us in heaven and “sing in the choir,” giving praise to God (Rev. 5:13). If the animals are destined to sing in the heavenly choir, we should recognize this by respecting their place in the world.

The Witness of the Fathers and Saints

Just as the Scriptures are clear in their teaching about animals and their importance, so are the saints. They offer a rich and varied commentary that takes us deeper into an awareness of the connectedness of life. In particular we should note the different reasons that the saints offer for respecting animals.

Tertullian (160-230), an early father from the second century, declared that not only are the animals created by God, but they have their own form of prayer.

‘Cattle and wild beasts pray, and bend their knees, and in coming forth from their stalls and lairs they too look up to heaven, their mouths not idle, Making the Spirit move in the fashion of their own kind.’

Origen (185-254), considered “the Father of Theology” by early Christians, tells us that there is a divine art in the structure of the world and in the distribution of the creatures: ‘The divine art that is manifested in the structure of the world is not only to be seen in the sun, the moon and stars; it operates also on earth on a reduced scale. The hand of the Lord has not neglected the bodies of the smallest animals – and still less their souls – because each of them is seen to possess some feature that is personal to it, for instance, the way it protects itself. Nor has the hand of the Lord neglected the earth’s plants, each of which has some detail bearing the mark of the divine art, whether it be the roots, the leaves, the fruits or the variety of species. In the same way, in books written under the influence of divine inspiration, Providence imparts to the human race a wisdom that is more than human, sowing in each letter some saving truth insofar as that letter can convey it, marking out thus the path of wisdom. For once it has been granted that the Scriptures have God himself for their author, we must necessarily believe that the person who is asking questions of nature, and the person who is asking questions of the Scriptures, are bound to arrive at the same conclusions.’ . Commentary on Psalm 1, 3 (PG 12, 1081)

St. Jerome (341-420), one of the western fathers and a historian of the early church, reminds us that we admire the Creator for His creation of the animals, even the insects. He tells us that the mind of Christ is present even in the small creatures as well as the large: ‘We admire the Creator, not only as the framer of heaven and earth, of sun and ocean, … But for bears and lions, and also as the Maker of tiny creatures: ants, gnats, flies, etc. So the mind that is given to Christ is equally earnest in small things as in great, knowing that an account must be made in the end for even an idle word.’

St. Basil the Great (329-379) says that we should care about the animals because the Lord has promised to save and redeem them as well as we humans:

‘For those, O Lord, the humble beasts that bear with us the burden and heat of the day and offer their guileless lives for the well-being of humankind; And for the wild creatures, whom Thou hast made wise, strong, and beautiful, We supplicate for them Thy great tenderness of heart, for Thou has promised to save both man and beast, and great is Thy loving kindness, O Master, Saviour of the world. ‘

St. John Chrysostom (347-407) writes that we should respect animals for many reasons, but “especially because they have the same origin as we do.” This should remind us that we are all connected.

St. John Climacus (509-603) relates that each animal embodies some portion of the wisdom of God:

‘Nothing is without order and purpose in the animal kingdom; each animal bears the wisdom of the Creator and testifies of Him. God granted man and animals many natural attributes, such as compassion, love, feelings… for even dumb animals bewail the loss of one of their own.’

St. Isaac the Syrian (640?-8th century) describes a person who has a charitable heart in terms of how that person relates to the animals.

‘What is a charitable[compassionate] heart? It is a heart which is burning with a loving charity for the whole of creation, for men, for the birds, for the beasts, for the demons – for all creatures. He who has such a heart cannot see or call to mind a creature without his eyes being filled with tears by reason of the immense compassion which seizes his heart. A heart which is so softened can no longer bear to hear or learn from others of any suffering, even the smallest pain, being inflicted upon any creature. This is why such a man never ceases to pray for the animals, for the enemies of truth, and for those who do him evil, that they may be preserved and purified. He will pray even for the lizards and reptiles, moved by the infinite pity which reigns in the hearts of those who are becoming united with God.’

St. Guthlac (673-714), one of the most revered and beloved of the early British saints, tells us that holiness tames the animals:

‘Brother, hast thou never learned in Holy Writ, that with him who has led his life after God’s will, the wild beasts and wild birds are tame?’ . (Felix’s Life of St. Guthlac)

His biographer, Cynewulf, considered the first great Anglo-Saxon poet, called St. Guthlac “the great hero of our time.” He then describes the saint through a narration on how the animals related to him:

‘Triumphant came he [St. Guthlac] to the hill; And many living things did bless his coming. With bursting chorus and with other signs The wild birds of the hill made known their joy Because this well-loved friend had now returned. Oft had he given them food when they were hungry, even starving, they had come straight to his hand and from it they ate their fill.’ . The Song of Guthlac

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), the great Russian novelist who was spiritually formed by the monks of Optina Pustyn monastery, teaches readers to look beyond the superficial appearance of things into the mystery of Christ hidden in all people and all things. In this view, he reflects the traditional Russian Christian attitude toward the land and the loving respect which is required of each person toward the earth and all its creatures:

‘Love the animals. God has given them the rudiments of thought and joy untroubled. Do not trouble their joy, do not harass them, do not deprive them of their happiness, do not work against God’s intent. Man, do not pride yourself on superiority to animals; they are without sin, and you, with your greatness, defile the earth by your appearance on it, and leave the traces of your foulness after you – Alas, it is true of almost everyone of us!’ . The Brothers Karamazov

A simple conclusion from the foregoing is that the Scriptures and the Saints agree that care for animals is a Christian concern. Both sources point to a spiritual obligation to respect the animals. They remind us that Christians have a responsibility to treat animals with a holy regard because they are God’s creatures and because they have an appointed place in His creation.

The Conclusion of Biologists and Scientists

The studies of biologists and scientists indicate that we have not done a good job at preserving the world’s living endowment of creatures.

Even though God has bestowed a great abundance of animal and plant species on the world, that abundance is in fast decline. As a society we are causing a rapid drop in the diversity of creatures that is threatening extinction for a quarter of all mammals, a third of amphibians, and half of all coral reef species, according to a 2009 report from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

In assembling their report on endangered species, the IUCN found that many more species are now in peril of extinction than when a similar study was conducted five years ago. According to report editor Jean Christophe Vie, “Biodiversity continues to decline. It’s happening everywhere.” Mr. Vie said biodiversity threats need to be highlighted and combated, even at a time when world leaders are preoccupied with economic recession. Unlike financial markets and debts, extinction is irreversible. Once a species disappears, it is gone forever.

Mr. Vie urged that governments and citizens undertake a series of lifestyle changes to lessen the use of energy and reduce consumption, redesign cities, and reassess the environmental consequences of globalization – producing goods in poor countries where wages are low and transporting them thousands of miles for sale in places where wages are high, such as the United States and Europe. Vie added that the danger from global climate change will only make this situation worse.

In Europe, “about 50 percent of all animal species are vulnerable,” observes Barbara Helfferich, a European Union spokeswoman. “Habitats are shrinking and a lot needs to be done. We are not doing enough to halt biodiversity loss.” Part of the problem is that most people fail to see how their actions have consequences for the natural world.

To illustrate the interconnectedness between human actions and creatures, examine the story of a malaria epidemic in Borneo. The World Health Organization (WHO) tried to control the disease by eradicating mosquitoes by using DDT, a pesticide now banned in most countries. The DDT did its job and eradicated most of the mosquitoes. But then a series of unexpected consequences began to unfold. The pesticide also wiped out the wasps that had controlled the local thatch-eating insects. The result was that the straw roofs on the local huts began to collapse. At the same time the DDT poison accumulated in the lizard population because the lizards ate the dying mosquitoes. This caused the cats which dined on the lizards to bioaccumulate the DDT and die from pesticide poisoning. Without cats the rat population multiplied and unleashed a ferocious epidemic which infested fields and villages and decimated the food crops. To cure this larger problem, the WHO was forced to parachute in 14,000 new cats to control the rats in what officially became known as “Operation Cat Drop.”

The lesson from this situation is that by using a dangerous pesticide to remove a serious insect pest, nature’s balance was disrupted and the intended solution caused far more problems for the local population than the problem which originally existed. This sequence of unexpected consequences shows that solutions to problems must be in harmony with nature and they must not create additional new problems.

Why are we concerned about losing animal and plant species?

God gave the world such an abundance of different animals and plants, it might seem that if we lose a few, it wouldn’t make too much difference. In fact this is not true. Each creature is important and should be preserved. Here are several perspectives that should help to understand this situation.

When humans cause a species to go extinct, this demonstrates that we are living out of harmony with God’s commands and His creation.

The very existence of species that are threatened because of human impact tells us that we are living in a manner that is destructive to the life of the world. Endangered species are evidence of a failure to respect and have holy regard for what God has created on earth. If we disregard these species, retribution will likely come through a loss of the services which animal and plant species provide. For example, the island of Borneo possesses some of the world’s most amazing orchids. Estimates are that between 2,500 and 3,000 orchid species grow in its humid, but botanically unexplored rainforests. Many of these flowers are not yet catalogued by science. These orchids are highly valued for their exotic aromas and their amazing color combinations. But these orchids are endangered because of illegal logging, gold mining, and the clearing of forests to grow palm oil, and especially the illegal collecting and selling of wild orchids by orchid hunters who respond to high consumer demand for these beautiful flowers. Already these pressures in just the past decade have led to the extinction of hundreds of orchid species. According to a Global Forest Watch report, Indonesia is losing its forestlands so quickly that at the current rate of loss, Borneo’s forests could vanish entirely by 2015[30].

Our lifestyle is causing an accelerating rate of animal and plant extinctions.

Presently the world is losing an estimated 8,500 species per year. These species are disappearing for a variety of reasons, including pollution, habitat destruction, the introduction of invasive species, the early impacts of climate change, hunting and over harvesting, and the sprawl of cities due to growing human populations. This represents the loss of roughly one unique species every hour, or about 2% of all animal and plant species over the year. When this total is added to new estimates of how global climate change will increase the extinction rate, scientists report that by the middle of this 21st century (by the year 2050), we will be faced with the extinction and disappearance forever of roughly 50% of all the world’s species! Imagine how the world would be if half of all the animal and plant species disappear?

The extinction of animal and plant species threatens the food supply The world’s food supply is dependent upon the entire web of life for vigor, vitality and an ability to provide sustenance for a hungry human population. Every biological process has excess capacity built into its design to ensure strength and resilience. If one species disappears, there are sometimes others which can be substituted. However as we lose species, we remove components from a working biological system. For perspective, imagine you car. How would your car run if someone removed a few parts from your automobile each week? It would not take long before the car would no longer operate properly. The food chain is similar. If we lose the ability to pollinate crops, a service which insects, birds and small mammals provide, about one-third of all fruit and vegetable crops would no longer bear fruit.

Presently the U.S. is experiencing a steep decline in bee populations, mostly because of pesticides. Some top pollinating species are now down to only 4% of their historic numbers. As we lose pollinating insects, the food chain becomes at risk. This is a sobering situation because the world has a growing population, but a declining agricultural base. A declining food supply coupled with a growing population means future hunger and starvation in some parts of the world. Protection of endangered species becomes protection for a healthy food chain and a healthy population.

The human economy is dependent upon the right functioning of nature

Humans depend on ecosystems such as coastal waters, prairie grasslands, and ancient forests to purify their air, clean the water, and supply food. When species become endangered, this indicates that these ecosystems are degrading. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that losing just one plant species can trigger the loss of up to thirty other insect, plant and higher animal species. Some individuals who have not examined the issue declare that the economy is what is important, not these species. They forget that the economy rests upon the right functioning of the air, water, soils, plants and all of the other elements of the living environment. The fact is, the economy should be seen as a wholly owned subsidiary of the environment. Healthy human society rests upon clean air, clean water and a vigorous ecosystem. Without a healthy environment, healthy families or a healthy economy cannot exist.

Nature holds cures for diseases that have not yet been discovered

Public health advocates add another argument for protecting plant and microbial species. They observe that we scarcely know what valuable medicines many of these unexamined species contain. For perspective only a small percentage of the world’s plants have been examined for medicinal values. To elaborate on an example from the previous chapter, just twenty-five years ago, loggers considered the Pacific yew tree a “trash tree.” Pharmacologists then discovered that the bark of this thin, scraggily tree contained a unique compound, taxol. This bioactive chemical turned out to be a potent drug in the fight against lung and ovarian cancers. Because of the unique substances in the bark of the Pacific yew tree, tens of thousands of people now live who previously would have died. Like unread books in a library, species may have value that only becomes apparent after they are properly studied.

What Are the Solutions?

Solutions to save endangered animal and plant species take place at several levels:

(1) in the home and local parish, (2) in the community by the shaping attitudes and influencing public policy on endangered species, and (3) in the halls of government.

Here are suggestions on what you can do in your home and parish: —

*Develop respect and reverence for all life, including animals. Cultivate a consistent pro-life attitude. As you respect God’s life in creation through the creatures, you are respecting what God has created. Know that in a reduced and diminished manner, the animals also bear some portion of the image of God.

* Learn about the endangered species in your area. Before you can protect endangered species, you should identify them. Learn about their place in the local environment. Find out where they live and why they are endangered. Education and information are essential in protecting them. Make an effort to observe them and see them as God’s creation. Tell your friends and family about the birds, fish, and plants that live near you and your community.

* Minimize herbicide and pesticide use. Herbicides and pesticides may keep yards looking nice, but they are hazardous pollutants that harm wildlife at many levels. Many herbicides and pesticides take a long time to degrade; they build up in the soils and from there migrate into the food chain. Predators such as hawks, owls and coyotes are harmed if they eat tainted or poisonous animals. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, are especially vulnerable.

* Recycle all wastes and buy sustainable products. Buy recycled paper, and other sustainable products like bamboo and certified Forest Stewardship Council wood products to protect forests and forest species. Never buy furniture made from rainforest wood. Recycle your cell phones because a mineral used in cell phones and other electronics is mined in gorilla habitat. Minimize the use of palm oil because forests where tigers live are being cut down to plant palm plantations.

* Plant native vegetation. Native plants provide food and shelter for native wildlife. Attracting native insects like bees and butterflies helps to pollinate your plants. Invasive species compete with native species for resources and habitat. They can even prey on native species directly, forcing native species towards extinction.

*Make your parish and home wildlife friendly. If you live in a rural area, secure garbage in shelters or cans with locking lids, feed pets indoors and lock pet doors at night to avoid attracting wild animals. Reduce the use of water in your home and garden so that animals that live nearby can have a better chance of survival. Disinfect bird baths to avoid disease transmission. Place decals on windows to deter bird collisions. Millions of birds die unnecessarily every year because of collisions with windows. You can help reduce the number of collisions simply by placing decals on the windows in your home and office.

*Never purchase products made from threatened or endangered species. Overseas trips can be exciting, but souvenirs are sometimes made from species nearing extinction. Avoid supporting the illegal wildlife market. Avoid items made from ivory, tortoise-shell, or coral. Be careful of products made from or including fur from lions, tigers, polar bears, sea otters, crocodile skin, live monkeys or apes, most live birds including parrots, macaws, cockatoos and finches, some snakes, turtles and lizards, some orchids and cacti, or medicinal products made from rhinos, tigers, Asiatic black bear, or any other endangered wildlife.

*Restrain harassment of threatened and endangered species. Harassing wildlife is cruel and illegal. Shooting, trapping, or forcing a threatened or endangered animal into captivity is also illegal and can lead to their extinction. Don’t participate in these activities, and report them as soon as you see an incident to your local, state, or federal wildlife enforcement office.

* Protect wildlife habitat. The greatest threat that many endangered species face is the destruction of their habitat (i.e., the places where they live). Scientists say that the best way to protect endangered species is to protect the places where they live. Wildlife, just like people, must have places to find food, shelter and raise their young. Logging, over-grazing, mining, oil and gas drilling, and development all cause habitat destruction. As you protect habitat, you also protect whole communities of animals and plants.

* Encourage parks and protected wild areas. Parks, wildlife refuges, and other open space should be protected near your community. Open space provides great places to visit and enjoy. Support wildlife habitat and open space protection in your community. When you are buying a house, consider your impact on wildlife habitat.

*Harmonize your lifestyle with God’s creation. As Orthodox Christians who submit to the Scriptures and Holy Tradition, we must face the seriousness of the extinction threat. We are to take the steps in attitude and lifestyle that will prevent the extinction of species and preserve the abundance and biodiversity which is essential to the flourishing of life.

Action must also take place by the larger community and by state and national government. Without government participation, individual action will not be sufficient.

* Preserve the Endangered Species Act. Legislation by Congress provides a first line of protection for most U.S. endangered species. This is our modern Noah’s Ark. Once designated as endangered or threatened, a species cannot be destroyed nor can its habitat be eliminated. Private landowners should be recognized and applauded who voluntarily protect rare plants and animals. All these efforts need to continue and expand to keep our natural heritage alive.

*Develop parish public policy advocacy. Orthodox parishes must become informed and active regarding the preservation of habitats and biodiversity. They must learn how to stand up for what God has created. This means that they should consider advocacy together with other community groups to ensure that development and industrialization do not impair the integrity of wetlands, streams, fields, and forests.

* Acknowledge and support positive actions. Parish creation care ministries should acknowledge and commend companies that have pledged to stop purchasing lumber from endangered forests. They should encourage Church and other purchasers of wood and paper products to make serious efforts to avoid purchasing products made from endangered forests.

* Cultivate civic responsibility for our nation’s laws and policies. Write the United States Congress and the White House, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Interior Department (especially its Fish and Wildlife Department), as well as state governments, and urge these departments to refrain from efforts to abolish or undercut established policies and initiatives to protect endangered species. Ask them to preserve wetlands, to minimize road building in national forests, and to preserve roadless wilderness areas.

* Urge local government to refrain from unnecessary development. The parish ministry of God’s creation should ask the President and the Congress to respect God’s creation. They should call upon our leaders to drop plans to explore for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. This will have serious adverse effects on this unique but fragile ecosystem upon which many kinds of wildlife as well as indigenous people depend. We should urge government, industry, agriculture and individuals to face the urgency of energy conservation and to accelerate the transition from a fossil fuel base to a solar and alternative energy base for the economy.

* Teach young people respect for animals in parish schools. We should educate young people and encourage parish members to acknowledge the Orthodox vision of creation. This vision discerns Christ and the Holy Spirit as our “Heavenly King” who is “everywhere present and fills all things.” The implications of this vision should be taught to all children and emphasized to all adults. The statements of His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and our other hierarchs on the care of God’s creation should be read and there should be opportunities to deepen faith through awareness that Orthodoxy implies a lifestyle of restraint, conservation and frugality in our use of the world’s resources.

Through the actions listed above, we extend the life of the Church into the life of the home and society. In the process we articulate an Orthodox way of life that is consistent with Jesus Christ, constructive, and earth healing. The more these guidelines are embraced, the more the consequences extend beyond endangered animal species into the larger society. These actions fortify the parish in virtue, strengthen families in the love of God, and teach children in a manner that provides stability into the future. For those who embrace these guidelines, the practice of respect for creation will strengthen spiritual vitality and bestow an ability to withstand the assaults of a coarsening culture upon those who strive to follow the Way and the Life of our Lord Jesus Christ.

‘Scientists emphasize that climate change has the potential to destroy the entire ecosystem which sustains not only the human species but also the wondrous world of animals and plants. The choices and actions of what is otherwise civilized modern man have led to this tragic situation, which in essence is a moral and spiritual problem which the divinely inspired Apostle Paul articulated with colorful imagery in underlining its ontological dimension. “For creation was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but by reason of him who subjected it… For we know that the whole creation groans and travails in pain together until now” (Romans 8:20,22). ‘ – HAH Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew September 1, 2008

‘We in the Orthodox Church see Creation as the foundational concept by which we understand all environmental issues. When a creature is created, that creature has meaning, value and purpose. This is true whether that creature is a human person, an animal, an insect, a plant, a tree, a geological formation, or an astronomical body. It is impossible to exaggerate the importance of creation as a foundational concept. It means that we must accept the reality of every creature as meaningful. ‘ – HE Metropolitan +Nicholas of Amissos Antiochian Village, June 15, 2002

In affirming the sacred images, the Seventh Ecumenical Council (Nicaea, 787) was not primarily concerned with religious art, but with the presence of God in the heart, in others and in creation. For icons encourage us to seek the extraordinary in the ordinary, to be filled with the same wonder of the Genesis account, when: “God saw everything that He made, and indeed, it was very good” (Gen. 1.30-31)….

‘Icons are invitations to rise beyond trivial concerns and menial reductions. We must ask ourselves: Do we see beauty in others and in our world? The truth is that we refuse to behold God’s Word in the oceans of our planet, in the trees of our continents, and in the animals of our earth. In so doing, we deny our own nature, which demands that we stoop low enough to hear God’s Word in creation. We fail to perceive created nature as the extended Body of Christ. Eastern Christian theologians have always emphasized the cosmic proportions of divine incarnation. For them, the entire world is a prologue to St. John’s Gospel. And when the Church overlooks the broader, cosmic dimensions of God’s Word, it neglects its mission to implore God for the transformation of the whole polluted cosmos. On Easter Sunday, Orthodox Christians chant: Now everything is filled with divine light: heaven and earth, and all things beneath the earth. So let all creation rejoice.’ – HAH Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew . Fordham University, October 27, 2009

‘It is unfortunate that we lead our life without noticing the environmental concert that is playing out before our eyes and ears. In this orchestra, each minute detail plays a critical role. Nothing can be removed without the entire symphony being affected. No tree, animal, or fish can be removed without the entire picture being distorted, if not destroyed.’ – HAH Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew Moscow, Russia, May 26, 2010

‘Far too long have we limited our understanding of community, reducing it to include only human beings. It is time that we extend this notion also to include the living environment, to animals and to trees, to birds and to fishes. Embracing in compassion all people as well as all of animal and inanimate creation brings good news and fervent hope to the whole world.’ – HAH Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew June 30, 2004

The ecological problem is fundamentally a spiritual problem


Following on from the last post on St Isaac’s teaching on a compassionate heart, here is further commentary from HE Archbishop Ieronymos of Athens, made on World Environment Day, June 4th 2019.

“The ecological problem is fundamentally a spiritual problem”

“47 years have passed since June 5, 1971, when work began for the first World Environment Day in Stockholm, as part of the United Nations consultation. For the first time, the political, social, and economic dimensions of the ecological problem were discussed, with the aim of taking corrective measures. Since then, June 4 has been set as a World Day for awareness and information on environmental issues.

Every year, on this day, we say that we “celebrate the environment!” However, this expression shows that for many, after so many years, ignorance and indifference still exist in the area of environment. Because it is not a celebration, but a day of reflection and taking stock of the efforts made to protect creation. It is a decisive day for the renewal of the fight for the salvation of our house, which was offered to us by the Creator, our planet Earth.

I have many times expressed the opinion that quite often, the discussions and the demonstrations on this subject are reminiscent of dialogues of the deaf. While in theory, all of us perceive the critical state of the issue and many do take initiatives or strive eagerly to contribute to its resolution, the problem remains and has not been corrected. 

But above all things, we must be led to the true knowledge of ourselves, in order to correctly interpret the word and the blessing of God given to the first created beings, with regard to creation and environment: “Be fruitful and multiply; fill the earth and subdue it; have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over every living thing that moves on the earth” (Genesis 1:27-28).

The world is not the result of coincidences or accidental necessities, but is was conceived by the Creator as a springboard for salvation. We human beings have, or at least say we have, a regulatory role in creation, as its crowning. However, we often forget our relationship with God and our place in creation. We become autonomous, guided by dominating concepts and behaviors, which are oppressing towards our fellow beings and the environment.

The saints of the Orthodox Church, having accomplished the purpose of their existence as human beings and participating in the divine glory, show and teach us ecological idea. Thus St. Isaac the Syrian defines the merciful heart as “a heart burning for the whole creation, for people, for birds, for animals, for demons, and for all creatures.” As for Saint Cosmas of Aetolia, he prophesied that “people will become poor because they will not love trees.”

Therefore, the ecological problem is fundamentally a spiritual problem, with enormous moral dimensions. If we do not free ourselves from egocentrism and eudemonism, if we do not have an ascetic vision of creation and of our rational and conscious use of material goods and wealth, the ecological problem will spread, instead of being stopped. This is why the fundamental challenge of World Environment Day is for all to repent, to return to God the Creator, and to reintegrate ourselves in the perspective of the divine plan for creation and the environment.”

What is a compassionate heart?

Having just had a meeting with other animal advocacy/justice groups and hearing/feeling the great compassion in the room, I thought i would add here St. Isaac’s teaching on inclusivity, which extends to all of God’s created beings. This is another key component of an Eastern Orthodox position on animal suffering and sooooo much earlier than St Francis:

“And what is a merciful heart…the burning of the heart unto the whole creation, man, fowls and beasts, demons and whatever exists. So that by the recollection and the sight of them the eyes shed tears on account of the force of mercy which moves the heart by great compassion…Then the heart becomes weak and it is not able to bear hearing or examining injury or any insignificant suffering of anything in creation…And therefore, even in behalf of the irrational beings and the enemies of truth and even in behalf of those who do harm to it, at all time he offers prayers with tears that they may be guarded and strengthened: even in behalf of the kinds of reptiles, on account of his great compassion which is poured out in his heart without measure, after the example of God.”[1]

In this teaching, St. Isaac draws us back to the key point of Image of God – mercy, love and compassion “are after the example of God.”To ensure the correct translation, I sought advice from the expert on Syriac studies, Dr. Sebastian Brock who confirms that ‘compassionate’ is the closest to the original Syriac meaning.

[1] Isaac, Mystic Treaties, Ch. 1, Homily 7.

HALKI 111 SUMMIT ON “THEOLOGICAL FORMATION AND ECOLOGICAL AWARENESS”: Reflections.

His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew recently hosted the third Halki Summit from May 31st to June 4th, 2019. The summit convened distinguished representatives of Orthodox theological schools and seminaries from all over the world, and focused on the theme of “Theological Formation and Ecological Awareness.” Some 50 delegates from over 40 institutions were in attendance.

Summit participants heard addresses by prominent environmental theologians (Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant), and discussed ways in which ecological awareness and compassionate care for animals, could be fostered and advanced in Orthodox institutions of higher learning throughout the world by means of courses and other programs related to creation care.

The ultimate purpose of this event was to promote environmental sensitivity, including compassionate care for animals, in the core curricula of theological institutions by continuing the spirit of dialogue and exchange expressed during the two previous summits; as well as the Ecumenical Patriarchate’s long standing concern and ongoing initiatives over three decades for the protection of the natural environment.

Presenting my book to HAH Bartholomew, Halki 111, Summit, 2019.

My role was to speak on behalf of the animals and I outlined how compassionate care for animals has always been an integral part of Orthodox theology and offered avenues for academic exploration of the theme. In order to facilitate engagement, I presented each institution with a copy of my recent book which outlines many early and contemporary examples of compassionate teachings. It offers a theology of compassion and integration rather than that offered by the existing dominant theology of separation.

I argued that it is time for us to turn away from the utilitarian arguments of Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas and turn instead to early and contemporary Orthodox teachings which advocate extending justice and mercy to the non-human world.

I also asked that we accept offers to participate in projects such as the Christian Ethics of Farmed Animal Welfare, even if we are unsure of our ability to commit to their findings. Establishing an Orthodox voice in the West should be part of our collective Mission to ‘spread the good news of Christ’ and Mission was the overarching theme of my presentation.

In the question and answer section of our session, I was asked two questions – one on Personhood and the other on Animal Experimentation, neither of which related to my presentation. I admit to being taken back by such questions from an audience consisting mainly of theologians but it indicates that they too are interested in such topics. I was comforted by comments from a senior theologian that i successfully defended my position but I would have preferred that questions had focused on the topic of education, rather than the two most emotive themes in the Animal Protectionist world.

There is now a steering committee, which will try to keep the spirit of cooperation and collaboration moving forward and hopefully we shall soon see positive changes in academic and seminary courses.

You can learn more about the Halki 111 Summit and the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew’s environmental justice positions  on the website.
https://www.patriarchate.org.

German Circus Replaces Live Animals With Cruelty-Free Holograms

This is an interesting post on how circuses can exist without the use of animals.

Circus Roncalli in Germany recently unveiled a stunning and innovative act featuring computer-generated holograms of wild animals. The act — brought to life by projectors, lasers and lenses — is not only enchanting to watch, but also completely cruelty-free.

Circuses have been entertaining people throughout the world for centuries, but they’ve recently come under scrutiny for their treatment of the animals used in their shows. The failure of the circus industry to effectively address these concerns has resulted in dwindling ticket sales.

Circus acts commonly feature wild animals, including elephants, tigers and camels. While in the wild, these species traverse vast ecosystems where they can express their natural behaviors. But in the circus, they are forced to live in captivity and be carted from show to show.

According to PAWS, circus animals spend almost 96 percent of their lives in chains or cages. Many animals have minimal stimulation. And highly social species, such as elephants, may be isolated from conspecifics. This deprivation can have serious deleterious effects on the mental well-being of animals, who often display signs of distress while in the circus.

When the animals are performing, they may be forced to do demeaning tricks that treat these majestic species as props for human entertainment. The tricks, such as having elephants perform handstands, are far outside the animals’ normal behavior.

To get the animals to complete these tricks, cruel training tools — such using bullhooks, whips and rods — may be used. Undercover investigations have revealed instances of circus staff repeatedly hitting elephants, as well as whipping a tiger 31 times in less than two minutes.

roaring lioness sitting in a circus arena cage

Credit: NejroN/Getty Images

In recent years, public sentiment has shifted as more people have become aware of the cruelty circus animals endure. A 2019 poll found only 30% of people believe circus animals are treated well, and over 50% support the prohibition of wild animals in circuses.

Bans on circus animals have been popping up in the United States at the local and state levels. In 2018, New Jersey became the first state to ban the use of wild animals in traveling acts. At the city level, both Los Angeles and New York City have also banned using wild animals in circuses.

The circus industry has been slow to adapt to concerns over animal welfare. Ringling Bros. closed down in 2017 due to declining ticket sales — likely a result of changing attitudes toward circus animals. Although Ringling Bros. stopped using elephants in its performances the previous year, the change was too small to salvage the company’s reputation.

The recent hologram animal act at Circus Roncalli illustrates how the industry can use ingenuity to keep the spirit of the circus alive without sacrificing animal welfare. Other circuses should follow suit. And soon they may need to if the Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act — which would ban the use of wild animals in traveling acts — becomes law.

The circus is beloved throughout the world for its awe-inspiring acts showcasing people with incredible talents — from the tightrope walkers to the jugglers and trapeze artists. But if the industry does not evolve past animal cruelty, the shows may soon be closing their door.

Towards a Greener Attica – Film preview

This film began the recent Halki Summit 111 which focused on the need to adapt Academic and Seminary education to include care for the creation/animals. It relates to an earlier event (below) and speaks to many environmental and ecological concerns and indicates potential answers to the problem of climate change – including changes in our diet.

An Eastern Orthodox Tale from Jerusalem

We have just received this email from a young Canadian man who first contact us, declaring that he was studying Orthodoxy and pleased to see that there is an Orthodox charity trying to educate Orthodox on various aspects of the animal suffering theme. At one point he had reservations and we are pleased that our mission played a small part in his continuing with his studies. He is now Orthodox and visiting Jerusalem. Here he describes a familiar story to many across the globe, who cooperate with God by working to reduce the suffering of animals. I briefly touched upon the subject of neutering in my presentation at the Halki Summit 111 and this story describes why their is a need to make it clear, through our priests, that the Orthodox Church does not prohibit the neutering of animals. This position aligns with all Animal Protection groups who teach that this is the only way of humanely dealing with the intransigent problem of over-population of cats and dogs. Here is his recent experience:

I have been in Jerusalem about a month, visiting, and during that time, seeing various religious sites, with a friend, Vladimir. During that time I met Tova Saul, a veteran cat rescuer who has been doing this for 40 years in the Old City of Jerusalem. There is a serious cat overpopulation problem in Jerusalem and all of Israel and the Mediterranean region, resulting in about 200,000 feral cats in this city alone. You see the cats everywhere. They have become a regular fixture of the city – but there is a great deal of suffering they experience that we don’t see: most of the kittens die, in cat nests in bushes and alleyways, soon after birth.

Sadly, most people here are indifferent to the fate of animals – which is largely true everywhere, but in this place it includes an indifference to cats as well as other species. And I am told there are many feral dogs in the country, outside of town. Tova is the only person I know of here who goes out to trap-spay-release them. She seems to be well-known internationally for her good work, as this National Geographic video illustrates:  https://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/news/0000015a-d3d8-d979-adfa-ffff9fd70000  and this article https://www.timesofisrael.com/at-midnight-jerusalem-old-citys-cat-lady-prowls/ and this BBC video:   https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-middle-east-40869159/jerusalem-s-cat-lady-crossing-boundaries.

There appears to be little in the way of government support for this, and she and a handful of other rescuers in this country do this work as volunteers. Even working full-time they cannot keep up with the problem. See attached chart to see how 12 cats can produce 2 million within 8 years – and the only reason the world is not totally overrun with cat is that most kittens die a slow and cruel death. Cat rescuers who do trap-spay/neuter-release are trying to prevent that needless suffering. If Tova spays one cat it prevents the suffering of hundreds, if not thousands, in time.

Human beings domesticated cats about 5,000 years ago, and thus it is our moral responsibility to mitigate their suffering however we can. Humane population control is the best way. Adoption is a secondary measure but doesn’t begin to solve it. Tova manages to save many kittens and find adoptive homes for them, mostly in Tel-Aviv, with volunteer help from a couple of women, Tali and Svetlana. She has a website with details about how one can donate through PayPal to her work.  https://holylandcats.wordpress.com/how-you-can-help/  I would much rather give to this than to a charity where most of the money goes to overhead and large salaries. I know that 100% of the money for this goes to animal welfare and rescue efforts.

She buys food and sees that they obtain medical care with this money. She also has a car that she uses and from the looks and sound of it, it’s in need of a lot of mechanical work. Without it should not get to the vet to have them fixed. Some good people donated funds for an electric cart for her to use as well, to move traps around in, in the alleyways.

She applies medicine to their eyes to prevent blindness (eye infections in kittens are common), and takes them to the vet, and nurses them back to health, to where they are adoptable. And there is the non-stop trap-spay-release work.

Here is her latest video of rescue efforts for kittens: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnanEZsAbWM&feature=youtu.be    In the video you can see that the Old City is a labyrinth of narrow alleys. It has been around for about 3,000 years and is composed of residences, shops and markets, synaogogues, mosques, and churches.

Here is another video, I took, of Tova explaining her cat rescue work and video to two Dutch cat rescuers who come here regularly to take cats back there to be adopted: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCxxBQfI8jQ  There are more videos on her website.

The entire Mediterranean has a cat overpopulation problem, due to the warm weather year-round. Hindering the problem is not just widespread indifference but also religious and the cultural bias of people who think we ought not to interfere with animals’ reproduction. And apparently lack of funding and incompetence on the part of the government in dealing with the issue (see https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-as-stray-cats-multiply-spaying-programs-lag-over-lack-of-funds-1.5468628).

From the article: “chairman of the animal rights caucus at the Knesset”, Itzik Shmuli, points an accusing finger at the Agriculture Ministry. “The current policy is simply a criminal policy, creating a situation in which the main agency that is supposed to be eradicating animal distress is directly causing it,” he said. “When instead of supporting neutering programs, they choose the approach of ignoring [the problem] or proposing crazy suggestions such as flying cats abroad, they are just making the crisis worse  and increasing the suffering of the animals.”

The Minister of Agriculture is indifferent because the general populace is indifferent, so ultimately that change must come from a groundswell of concern – and I would argue that religion ought to be an instrumental force in that. If it is not, then religious authorities are failing to use it properly for the good of the world, contrary to many of the teachings of these religions.

There is a fear of animals among many Orthodox Jews and Muslims that results in their rejection fo the idea of animals as pets. A cultural and religious bias here is taught at an early age. Children are taught to avoid animals, going against their natural instinct to be curious about them, and befriend them. Of course part of it is that many people here eat animals – sheep, goats, cows, chicken (but not pigs) — and all these animals suffering horrendously their whole lives in factory farms and during live transport and slaughter – just like everywhere else on this planet – except that some say that kosher and halal slaughter is more cruel as the animals are fully conscious during it, in contrast to being stunned by an air-compressed bolt.

In Tel-Aviv – a largely secular city – there is now a growing vegan movement, illustrating the fact that where religion has failed secular rights ethics seem to have succeeded – at least in part.

A lot of animals must suffer heat stress during livet transport as it is so hot here: there is a “Stop Live Transport” protest group in Tel-Aviv. They did this when the Eid festival happened, at the end of Ramadan, when millions of sheeps and goats were transported on ships from Australia in terrible conditions, with many dying en route.

It is not just in this region: I saw the same cultural bias in eastern Europe, resulting in packs of feral dogs running loose, and no effort to help them except from a handful of women operating as volunteers. What money the government allocated for the dog shelter ended up being stolen there by officials and the dogs were starving to death in the shelters, in the most abysmal conditions. The women came and raised money to feed them and spay/neuter them and to find homes for them in the EU – though most were not saved and the needless suffering there continues, simply because there are too many and not enough people who care. It’s the same all over third world countries as well. It’s only in the West that dogs and cats seem to find favour, but even there many or most just end up in high-kill shelters who inject or gas them to death, to keep numbers down.

Lack of concern for animals goes against the grain of a child’s natural curiosity and concern for them, so a lot of Tova’s work is focused on teaching young children to be concerned for them. She wants to devote more of her energies to education at this point, but she needs help. I can envisage a program where young adults go out with her to help and that way learn from her how to trap and care for cats.

I have been out with Tova on three occasions late at night to trap cats in the Muslim Quarter of the Old City (it is divided into Muslim, Christian, Jewish, and Armenian Quarters). On just those three nights she trapped a dozen female cats and the were all spayed at the vet the next day – and this in the long run will prevent tens of thousands of kittens dying of disease, starvation, injury, and flea bites – just from three nights’ work. Tova goes out alone in the middle of the night to do this, in sometimes completely dark alleyways where you have to find your way slowly or risk tripping, and there are often men out there in these alleyways, and Jews have been knifed in the Old City even while I was here – but  even as a lone Jewish woman at night in dark alleys with Arab men she is completely fearless and says she doesn’t think about it. Mostly the people we meet – young Arab men and boys out very late at night, some drinking and smoking – are curious about what she is doing, and some are even supportive.

One Muslim boy of about 12, named Joseph, says he saved several kittens himself and offered them to Tova, but Tova’s place is already overrun with cats, many of them rescues. She has an interesting story about one of the worst incidences she experienced: three Orthodox Jewish Hasedim teenage boys who argued with her and hindered her work and called her a “Nazi” for helping animals. It ended in them all being taken to the police station. She said “say that one more time and I will dump this hummus on you!” The boy did and she put hummus on him. He called the police and hours and manpower were wasted sorting it out at the station.

I ran into an Orthodox Jewish man last night near the Western Wall who was also curious about it and took some photos of her work with his phone and grasped in broken English what it was about. But Tova is single-minded in her work and doesn’t like to stop to educate everyone on it, so she goes out very late (often after midnight) to do this work, when there are fewer people to interfere with it.

Cat are noctural, and wherever she goes in the Old City she calls to them and they know the sound of her voice and come running. She gives them some food and inspects to see if they are male of female, and if the latter, pregnant or not. She has an experienced eye and can tell right away. She traps only females and keeps the males away from the trap with food and sometimes spray from a water bottle. This is a sort of triage, because there are so many and one females can produce generations of new cats. She will catch in one night as many as the vet can take the next day. She has been working with the same vet for the last 25 years. She has a routine and is very experienced at catching them. I am told to stand back and just watch. I am there just to observe and to help car the traps.

Tova talks to the cats as they mill around her, in the narrow alleyways of the Old City. Once in the trap, the cat is scared but she consoles it and covers it with a blanket to provide it with the sense that it is hiding. My help to her was in carrying the cages. We go past checkpoints at the Western Wall, where she is allowed to park her car by special permit.

The last few times we have been going to the Small Western Wall just inside the Muslim Quarter and last night it was pitch black but we managed to see by moonlight and a light from her phone. She knows who she intends to catch and has seen them before or hears reports of females in certain areas. She goes with this plan in mind and does not stop till the females she wants are caught and in her car. At dawn she takes them to the vet. She must have had countless sleepless nights like this over the years.

Tova, I should add, is an Orthodox Jew, originally from Philadelphia. We disagree about religion – she is a religious exclusivist who is not fond of any other religion or even other forms of Judaism — and expresses herself strongly on this point (especially against Jews becoming Christians), but I respect her freedom of religion and speech, and I especially respect her great dedication to animals. To work for 40 years for animal welfare as a volunteer, day after day, night after night: this is a life well lived. I have been to her place for Shabbat dinner three times now and there is always a new guest – often from American or Europe – and she shows them the Western Wall and explains its history colourfully. The dinner is both kosher and vegan and always very good. She is a great host, and makes a living from running a space for ‘air B&B’ and doing travel guide tours. We went with a cat rescue couple to Hebron one day and met a Jewish boy who had rescued a donkey from abuse.

She has a good story about the one time she went on vacation, to Thailand, and allowed herself the luxury of being selfish just once. It did not last long. The bus she was on ran over a puppy in the middle of the jungle and she got off to rescue it. The bus went on without her and she luckily managed to hitch a ride with the puppy just before night fell in a strange land with no shelter. The people who picked her up where Christian missionaries who took her a town where she managed to find medical care for the dog, after considerable trouble, and the dog’s life was saved and he was adopted there. She ended up saving many dogs there – so her one effort to be selfish did not work. ‘Hashem’ (God) would not allow it for a moment, it seemed.

She was helped in this good work by several kind people at the time. It’s the same in Jersualem: there are often people willing to volunteer to give some small help, though there can always be more. Most nights she is out alone and has no help. To solve this problem there must be more people to step forward, and there must be widespread education of children, to urge them to care for animals. There is an SPCA in Jerusalem but I am told by everyone who knows of it – including its own representative – that kittens who go there are put down. It’s a ‘high-kill’ facility, simply because there are too many and not enough homes. Few get adopted. They are sitting in cages there in large numbers. I want to go film this before I leave this part of the world.

I did manage to rescue two kittens from the street since I have been here: one was adopted in Tel-Aviv, but the other is still with me, hiding in a box which is sitting on my bed in a hotel room. I pet her as type this and she plays with my hand, and purrs and is recovering. She is less adoptable than the first, because of fear. She was trapped inside a car motor for 20 hours before being released in front of about 40 Orthodox Jewish children. I don’t know what to do with her now or where there will be a home for her.
All the rescuers are full up with cats and there are not enough homes for them all – and as I said, most die a terrible death, of disease and flea bites and dehydration. I did not expect that my trip to the Holy Land would end up this way, but I am glad it did.

Please consider donating to HolyLandCats (https://holylandcats.wordpress.com/how-you-can-help/) and feel free to share these videos and this email if you feel like it.

7 Attachments;Preview YouTube video Haredi Boys, Greek Sisters, and Armenians Request Kitten RescuesHaredi Boys, Greek Sisters, and Armenians Request Kitten RescuesPreview YouTube video Cat rescuer Tova Saul talks with Dutch rescuers, Jewish Quarter, Old City, Jerusalem.Cat rescuer Tova Saul talks with Dutch rescuers, Jewish Quarter, Old City, Jerusalem.

ReplyForward

Climate Change Is the Symptom: Consumer Culture Is the Disease

For those of you who visit the site regularly, you will know that we continually urge individuals to act and make changes to their individual lives. This brief article articulates similar views.

A new report makes clear where much of the blame lies for our warming planet.

By Emily Atkin June 11, 2019

To save the planet, mankind must rapidly reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. But where should we be reducing those emissions from? What would make the biggest difference?

Journalists and environmentalists often answer that question by looking at which sectors of the U.S. economy contribute the most to global warming. Transportation (cars, buses, trucks, and planes) leads in greenhouse gas emissions, while electricity (coal and natural-gas power plants) is a close second. Industrial goods and services are third; buildings, fourth; and agriculture, fifth.

This way of measuring blame, however, misses something crucial: people. These industries are spouting carbon because customers demand their products: travel, electronics, entertainment, food, all sorts of stuffSo what if, instead of solely measuring emissions by economic sector, we looked at consumer demand within those sectors?

Researchers have done just that, and the results tilt the question of blame away from businesses and toward a different villain: ourselves.

C40 Cities, a network of 94 of the world’s biggest cities, released a report on Wednesday estimating how much consumption habits drive the climate crisis. The results were staggering: In those nearly 100 cities, where a combined 700 million live, the consumption of goods and services “including food, clothing, aviation, electronics, construction and vehicles” is responsible for 10 percent of global greenhouse gases. That’s nearly double the emissions from every building in the entire world.

If consumption-based emissions in those big cities continue on their current track, they will “nearly double between 2017 and 2050—from 4.5 gigatons to 8.4 gigatons per year,” the report says. That means the cities would not be able to achieve reductions necessary for the world to stay below 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming, which the scientific community says is necessary to preserve a livable planet. In fact, they would use up their budget for that target in the next 14 years.

For cities to do their part to limit global warming to 1.5°C, the report says, they must limit their consumption-based emissions by 50 percent by 2030, and 80 percent by 2050. That will be extremely challenging. It will require changes in how goods and services are produced on the industrial level, which will likely require policy intervention by national governments. Scientific advancements must be made as well, including “sweeping decreases in the carbon-intensity of industrial processes such as the making of steel, cement and petrochemicals,” the report reads.

There will be little incentive for businesses and governments to make these changes, however, if the people who support them—with dollars and votes, respectively—aren’t also making change a priority.

“Individual consumers cannot change the way the global economy operates on their own, but many of the interventions proposed in this report rely on individual action,” the report reads. “It is ultimately up to individuals to decide what type of food to eat and how to manage their shopping to avoid household food waste. It is also largely up to individuals to decide how many new items of clothing to buy, whether they should own and drive a private car, and how many personal flights to take.”

And this individual action must occur collectively. Put more bluntly, it will require personal sacrifice from our entire society. We will have to fly less, drive less, Uber less. We will have to eat less red meat, drink less dairy, waste less food, and generally buy less crap that we don’t need.

A lot of Americans won’t want to do this! So, our government may have to compel it, whether through the Green New Deal or some other legislation. Some countries are already taking small steps to address “throwaway culture”: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Monday that Canada will ban single-use plastics as early as 2021. But if the world is to stand a chance, the U.S. will have to take even bigger steps—nothing short of a wholesale rejection of modern American consumerism itself.

First Known Albino Slow Loris is Rescued From the Illegal Wildlife Trade

This is a good news article from the Care2 team. Having lived in this area we know how common it is for Indonesians to have wild animals as pets and how prevalent the wildlife trade is as a source of income for many poor people.

According to International Animal Rescue (IAR), which took part in the release, the area was chosen because it has plenty of food and its status as a conservation area will ensure protection from human activities. While the journey home has begun, this slow loris won’t be entirely on his own for a few more weeks.  First he will spend some time getting adjusted in a habituation area before being fully set free, and he’ll also be radio collared and monitored to ensure he’s thriving on his own after he is released.Hopefully he will. The illegal wildlife trade is now threatening all species of slow loris throughout their range, which isn’t just harming individuals, it’s taking a toll on the environment.

“Although this albino slow loris is extremely rare, it is still entitled to live freely in its natural habitat like other wildlife. The reintroduction of slow lorises into the wild can also provide benefits and carry out ecological functions in their natural habitat by controlling insects and pollinating plants,” said Teguh Ismail, Head of Lampung Region III Conservation Section BKSDA Bengkulu.

As IAR has previously pointed out, these shy, nocturnal animals are easily stressed and endure a number of heartbreaking abuses as a result of the pet trade. After being torn from their homes, some lorises in captivity are fed inappropriate diets, and others have their teeth crudely clipped or broken off without anesthesia to make them defenseless, which often leads to infection and death, and also makes them ineligible for release even if they are rescued.

“This is the first known albino loris in the world and therefore extremely rare. If it wasn’t for the incredible work of the authorities to combat illegal wildlife trade, this loris could easily have died in the hands of wildlife traffickers. Thankfully, we are able to give this animal another chance to live and thrive in the wild where it belongs,” said Karmele Llano Sanchez, Program Director of IAR Indonesia.

IAR is currently working to rescue, rehabilitate and release as many slow lorises as they can, in addition to educating people about why slow lorises shouldn’t be kept as pets in an effort to stop the trade and keep them safe in the wild where they belong.